Fifty Years since the 1967 Annexation of East Jerusalem: Israel, the United States, and the First United Nations Denunciation

in Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international
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Abstract

Israel’s annexation of East Jerusalem was condemned for the first time by the un one week after it took place in unga Resolution 2253. The United States chose to abstain rather than join the denunciation of Israel’s application of its domestic law to East Jerusalem. The claim I wish to make is that the us abstention did not spring from indifference to the question of sovereignty over East Jerusalem, as has previously been contested. The us perceived the Israeli move as contrary to international law, and an obstacle to the possibility of achieving a peaceful resolution to the conflict. Thus, the us abstention was in disregard of a un member state’s responsibility to ‘take effective collective measures for the prevention and removal of threats to the peace’, and contributed to the failure of the un peaceful conflict resolution mechanism to achieve a peaceful resolution to the dispute over East Jerusalem.

Fifty Years since the 1967 Annexation of East Jerusalem: Israel, the United States, and the First United Nations Denunciation

in Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international