Circumstantial versus Depictive Secondary Predicates in Literary Hebrew—The Influence of Yiddish and Russian

in Journal of Jewish Languages
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This article discusses the development of circumstantial secondary predicates in late Enlightenment and early Modern literary Hebrew under the influence of adverbial participle constructions in substrate languages, primarily Yiddish and Russian. Circumstantial secondary predicates differ from depictive secondary predicates, which are well-attested in Classical Hebrew.

Circumstantial versus Depictive Secondary Predicates in Literary Hebrew—The Influence of Yiddish and Russian

in Journal of Jewish Languages

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References

Goshen-GottsteinMoshe Henry Syntax and Vocabulary of Mediaeval Hebrew as Influenced by Arabic 2006 Revised by Shraga Assif and Uri Melamed. Jerusalem Ben-Zvi Institute Yad Izhak Ben-Zvi and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (in Hebrew).

Fabricius-HansenCathrineHaugDag Big Events Small Clauses. The Grammar of Elaboration 2012 Berlin Walter de Gruyter

JackendoffRay Semantic Structures 1990 Cambridge, MA MIT Press

Jewish Publication Society The Holy Scriptures according to the Masoretic Text 1917 Philadelphia, PA The Jewish Publication Society of America (JPS)

RappaportGilbert C. Grammatical Function and Syntactic Structure: The Adverbial Participle of Russian 1984 Columbus, OH Slavica Publishers

SadkaIsaac Studies in Syntax and Semantics 1997 Beer-Sheva Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Press (in Hebrew)

Schultze-BerndtEvaHimmelmannNikolaus P. “Depictive Secondary Predicates in Cross-linguistic Perspective.” Linguistic Typology 2004 8 1 59 131

StiffNahum Yidishe Stilistic 1930 Moscow Kharkov and Minsk 153 169 (in Yiddish)

The Academy of the Hebrew Language Ma’agarim: The Historical Dictionary of the Hebrew Language Jerusalem (in Hebrew)

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Stiff (1930) noted that adverbial participles with the suffix –endik were not common in Yiddish prose before Mendele. Perhaps it is possible to assume that the frequent usage of adverbial participle phrases in Russian prose affected Mendele’s both in Yiddish and in Hebrew.

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