From February Revolution to Civil War: Finnish Historians and the Year 1917

in Journal of Modern Russian History and Historiography
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

The major focus of Finnish historiography on the 1917 Revolution remains Finland’s secession from Russia in December 1917. However, now it is known that the secessionist ideas did not emerge immediately after the February Revolution but only after the Bolshevik takeover in October. Until then the goal of the Finnish political elites was to reformulate Finland’s autonomous position within the new post-tsarist Russia. Finnish business elites strove for access to Russian markets. The end of the Finnish coalition cabinet in July is seen as one of the turning points during 1917: the widening of the political gulf between non-socialist forces and the Social Democrats. During the fall of 1917, one of the major questions was why the Finnish Social Democrats ended the General Strike soon after they had declared it, and thus in effect terminated the revolution in Finland. The final question addressed by this article relates to Lenin’s motives in recognizing Finland’s independence.

Sections

References

9

Luntinen, “Autonomian vahvistamisyritys,” in Itsenäistymisen vuodet I, 159; Osmo Jussila, Suomen suuriruhtinaskunta 1809–1917 (Helsinki, 2004), 41; Seikko Eskola, Historian kuolema ja kulttuurien taistelu. Kirjoituksia historiasta ja nykyajasta (Helsinki, 2006), 23.

11

Jussila, Suomen suuriruhtinaskunta, 769; Luntinen, “Irti Venäjästä,” 191.

13

Kuisma, Sodasta syntynyt, 56.

16

Rasila, Istoriia, 176.

18

Pertti Luntinen, “Autonomian vahvistamisyritys” in Itsenäistymisen vuodet I, 181, and “Itsenäisyyspäätös kypsyy” in Itsenäistymisen vuodet I, 194.

20

Hannu Immonen, “Venäjän väliaikainen hallitus ja eduskunnan hajotus kesällä 1917,” in Suomi, itä, länsi (Helsinki, 1991), 92.

21

Immonen, Mechty, 213, 225.

22

Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 238.

23

Luntinen, “Autonomia,” 187; Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 208.

24

Virrankoski, Suomen historia, 302; Jutikkala, Pirinen, Suomen historia, 351–52.

25

Jussila, “March Revolution in Finland,” 102–03; Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 213–15, 219.

26

Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätrös,” 215, 218–19; Jutikkala, Pirinen, Suomen historia, 351–52, 355.

27

Klinge, “Inledning,” 23; Jussila, “Maaliskuun vallankumous ja Suomi,” 102–03; Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 215.

28

Manninen, “Kaartit vastakkain” in Itsenäistymisen vuodet I, 392.

29

Jussila, “Maaliskuun vallankumous ja Suomi”; Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 218.

31

Jussila, Suomen, 209.

32

Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 222.

33

Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 234.

34

Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 233–34.

37

Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 214–15, 219, 239, 241.

38

Luntinen, “Itsenäisyyspäätös,” 237; Timo Vihavainen, “Suomen itsenäistyminen suomalaisessa historiankirjoituksessa,” in Suomi ja Venäjä 1808–1809 (Helsinki, 2010), 234; Seppo Hentilä, “Suomi itsenäistyy,” in Osmo Jussila, Seppo Hentilä, Jukka Nevakivi, eds. Suomen poliittinen historia 1809–2009 (Helsinki, 2009), 106.

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 23 23 6
Full Text Views 4 4 4
PDF Downloads 0 0 0
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0