Fan and Non-Fan Recollection of Faces in Fandom-Related Art and Costumes

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture
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  • 1 Texas A&M University-Commerce
  • 2 Iowa State University
  • 3 Renison University College, University of Waterloo
  • 4 Niagara County Community College

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Abstract

We compared face recognition of humans and fandom-themed characters (art and costumes) between a sample of furries (fans of anthropomorphic animal art) and non-furries. Participants viewed images that included humans, drawn anthropomorphic animals, and anthropomorphic animal costumes, and were later tested on their ability to recognize faces from a subset of the viewed images. While furries and non-furries did not differ in their recollection of human faces, furries showed significantly better memory for faces in furry-themed artwork and costumes. The results are discussed in relation to own-group bias in face recognition.

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