“From Hypocrisy to Sincerity”

An Analysis of Motivational Narratives in Islamic State” Propaganda

in Journal of Muslims in Europe
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

This article analyses certain rhetorical aspects of “Islamic State” (IS) propaganda. Specifically, it discusses arguments used to concretise calls to action, focusing on recurring ways in which supposed benefits of engagement are contrasted with disadvantages of abstention. It appears that the opposing notions of “sincerity” and “hypocrisy” underpin many of the arguments presented, which prompts a closer look at their respective symbolisms. The rhetorical prominence of these antonyms indicates an apparently conscious attempt to address contemporary issues of social identity and political marginalisation, whereby the experiences of Muslim minorities (including those in Europe) are repeatedly used as a discouraging example.

“From Hypocrisy to Sincerity”

An Analysis of Motivational Narratives in Islamic State” Propaganda

in Journal of Muslims in Europe

Sections

References

  • AbbasTahir. 2014. “Muslim Political Radicalization in the West” in Routledge Handbook of Islam in the West edited by Roberto Totolli (Abingdon: Routledge: 272-288).

  • al-ʿAdnaniMuhammad. 2014. “This is the Promise of Allah”. Released as an Arabic-language audio message by Al-Furqan Foundation for Media Production and in translated (English) text form by Al-Hayat Media Center both on 29 June. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Ajnad Foundation for Media Production. 2014. Ummati qad laha fajarun. Translation provided by A. J. al-Tamimi “‘My Ummah Dawn Has Appeared’: Nasheed for the Islamic State of Iraq and ash-Sham”. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.aymennjawad.org.

  • al-BaghdadiAbu Bakr. 2014. “A Message to the Mujahidin and the Muslim Ummah in the Month of Ramadan”. Released as an Arabic-language audio message by al-Furqan Foundation for Media Production and in translated (English-language) text form by al-Hayat Media Center both on 1 July. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Furqan Foundation for Media Production. 2014a. “The Best Ummah”. Released around 28 May. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Furqan Foundation for Media Production. 2014b. “Special Coverage of the Khutbah and Jumuʿah Prayer in the Great Mosque in the City of Mosul”. Released 5 July. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net. English translation provided by al-Hayat Media Center and downloaded from www.archive.org on 3 November 2014.

  • Al-Furqan Foundation for Media Production. 2014c. “Upon the Prophetic Methodology”. Released 28 July. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Furqan Foundation for Media Production. 2014d. “Although the Disbelievers Dislike It”. Released 15 November. Accessed 14 August 2017. www.clarionproject.org.

  • Al-Furqan Foundation for Media Production. 2015. “And They Gave Zakah”. Released 17 June. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014a. “Imamah Is from the Millah of IbrahimDabiq1 pp. 20-31.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014b. “Hijrah from Hypocrisy to SincerityDabiq3 pp. 25-34.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014c. “The Islamic State before al-MalhamahDabiq3 pp. 5-11.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014d. “ForewordDabiq6 pp. 3-5.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014e. “There Is no Life without Jihad”. Released 19 June. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014f. “Al-Ghuraba, the Chosen Few of Different Lands: Abu Muslim from Canada”. Released 12 July. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014g. “Those Who Were Truthful with Allah”. Released 16 July. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014h. “Join the Ranks”. Released 22 July. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014i. “The End of Sykes-Picot”. Released 29 June. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014j. “Flames of War”. Released September. Accessed 14 August 2017. www.clarionproject.org.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2014k. “Race towards Good”. Released November. Accessed 14 August 2017. www.clarionproject.org.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2015. “And No Respite”. Released 24 November. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • Al-Hayat Media Center. 2016. “Hijrah Does Not Cease as Long as the Kuffar are FoughtRumiyah4: 2-3.

  • Al-Iʿtisam Foundation for Media Production. 2014. “Breaking the Border”. Released 29 June. Accessed 30 July 2017. www.jihadology.net.

  • AtranScott. 2011. Talking to the Enemy: Violent Extremism Sacred Values and What It Means to Be Human (London: Penguin).

  • BarrAndrew and Alexandra Herfroy-Mischler. 2017. “ISIL’s Execution Videos: Audience Segmentation and Terrorist Communication in the Digital AgeStudies in Conflict & Terrorism. DOI: 10.1080/1057610X.2017.1361282.

  • BartlettJamieJonathan Birdwell and Michael King. 2010. The Edge of Violence: A Radical Approach to Extremism (London: Demos).

  • Benmelech Efraim and Esteban K. Klor. 2016. “What Explains the Flow of Foreign Fighters to ISIS?” NBER Working Paper No. 22190 (Cambridge MA: National Bureau of Economic Research).

  • ChouliarakiLilie and Angelos Kissas. 2018. “The Communication of Horrorism: A Typology of ISIS Online Seath VideosCritical Studies in Media Communication35/1: 24-39.

  • DevjiFaisal. 2015. “A Life on the SurfaceHurst Publishers. DOI: https://www.hurstpublishers.com/a-life-on-the-surface/.

  • DrooganJulian and Shane Peattie. 2017. “Mapping the Thematic Landscape of Dabiq MagazineAustralian Journal of International Affairs71/6: 591-620.

  • EllulJaques. 1973. Propaganda: The Formulation of Men’s Attitudes (New York: Random House).

  • FawziSalua. 2014. “Social and Political Islamophobia: Stereotyping, Surveillance, and Silencing” in Routledge Handbook of Islam in the West edited by Roberto Totolli (Abingdon: Routledge) 229-243.

  • FishmanBrian. 2016. The Master Plan: ISIS al-Qaeda and the Jihadi Strategy for Final Victory (New Haven CT: Yale University Press).

  • FriisSimone Molin. 2015. “‘Beyond Anything We Have Ever Seen’: Beheading Videos and the Visibility of Violence in the War against ISISInternational Affairs91/4: 725-746.

  • FrissenThomasErkan TogusluPieter van Ostaeyen and Leen d’Haenens. 2018. “Capitalizing on the Koran to Fuel Online Violent Radicalization: A Taxonomy of Koranic References in ISIS’s DabiqTelematics and Informatics35/2: 491-503.

  • GoerzigCarolinKhaled al-Hashimi. 2015. Radicalization in Western Europe: Integration Public Discourse and Loss of Identity among Muslim Communities (Abingdon: Routledge).

  • HamidSadek. 2013. “The Attraction of ‘Authentic Islam’: Salafism and British Muslim Youth” in Global Salafism: Islam’s New Religious Movement edited by Roel Meijer (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 384-403.

  • HusseyAndrew. 2014. The French Intifada: The Long War between France and its Arabs (London: Granta).

  • IngeAnabel. 2017. The Making of a Salafi Muslim Woman: Paths to Conversion (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

  • IngramHaroro J. 2016. “An Analysis of Islamic State’s Dabiq MagazineAustralian Journal of Political Science51/3: 458-477.

  • KundnaniArun. 2015. The Muslims Are Coming!: Islamophobia Extremism and the Domestic War on Terror (London: Verso).

  • MacnairLogan and Richard Frank. 2018. “The Mediums and the Messages: Exploring the Language of Islamic State Media through Sentiment AnalysisCritical Studies on Terrorism. DOI: 10.1080/17539153.2018.1447226.

  • RoccaNoemi M. 2017. “Mobilization and Radicalization through Persuasion: Manipulative Techniques in ISIS’ PropagandaInternational Relations and Diplomacy5/11: 660-670.

  • RoyOlivier. 2017. Jihad and Death: The Global Appeal of Islamic State (London: Hurst).

  • SeidlerVictor J. 2007. Urban Fears and Global Terrors: Citizenship Multicultures and Belongings after 7/7 (Abingdon: Routledge).

  • SnowDavid A. and Robert D. Benford. 1988. “Ideology, Frame Resonance, and Participant MobilizationInternational Social Movement Research1: 197-217.

  • WiktorowiczQuintan. 2005. Radical Islam Rising: Muslim Extremism in the West (Lanham MD: Rowman and Littlefield).

  • WinterCharlie. 2015. The Virtual “Caliphate”: Understanding Islamic State’s Propaganda Strategy (London: Quilliam Foundation).

  • ØstebøTerje. 2013. “Growth and Fragmentation: The Salafi Movement in Bale, Ethiopia” in Global Salafism: Islam’s New Religious Movement edited by Roel Meijer (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 342-363.

  • ZelinAron. 2015. “Picture or It Didn’t Happen: A Snapshot of the Islamic State’s Official Media OutputPerspectives on Terrorism9/4: 85-97.

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 79 79 17
Full Text Views 31 31 12
PDF Downloads 12 12 10
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0