Ecumenical Discourse on Pneumatology and Ecology

in Journal of Reformed Theology
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Ecumenical Discourse on Pneumatology and Ecology

in Journal of Reformed Theology

References

2

James A. Nash“Towards the Ecological Reformation of Christianity”InterpretationVol. 50 (1996) 1 5-15.

4

See Jürgen MoltmannThe Spirit of Life: A Universal Affirmation (Philadelphia: Fortress Press1992).

6

See Geiko Müller-FahrenholzGod’s Spirit transforming a world in crisis (New York: Continuum1995).

7

See Mark I. WallaceFragments of the Spirit: Nature violence and the renewal of creation (New York: Continuum1996).

8

See Denis EdwardsBreath of life: A theology of the Creator Spirit (Maryknoll: Orbis Books2004).

9

See Sigurd BergmannCreation Set Free: The Spirit as Liberator of nature (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans2005).

11

See Hendrikus BerkhofThe Doctrine of the Holy Spirit (Richmond VA: John Knox Press1964).

13

See A. van de BeekDe Adem van God: De Heilige Geest in Kerk en Kosmos (Nijkerk: GF Callenbach1987).

14

See Michael WelkerGod the Spirit (Minneapolis: Fortress Press1994).

15

See Marthinus L. Daneel“African Independent Church pneumatology and the salvation of all creation,” Theologia Evangelica 25:1 (1992) 35-55.

19

Denis EdwardsBreath of life: A theology of the Creator Spirit (Maryknoll: Orbis Books2004). Edwards identifies two building blocks for a theology of the Spirit namely the story of the universe as told by modern science and the theological reflections on the Holy Spirit by Basil the Great. These enable him to trace the trajectory of the Spirit throughout the history of the cosmos the biblical traditions the Christ event the history of the church up till the present time. He then explores a theology of the Creator spirit as a midwife and companion while creation groans in giving birth as the one who brings each creature into a dynamic relationship with the triune communion and as the one who accompanies an evolving universe within the relational life of God. This enables him to discern the Creator Spirit as the One who continually works to transform and renew all forms of life both human and non-human who breathes life into the universe who enfolds human beings in grace who sanctifies the humanity of Jesus who is poured out on the church who is the midwife of the new creation who accompanies each creature with love and who makes space for the whole universe within the relationships that constitute the triune communion.

20

Sigurd BergmannCreation Set Free: The Spirit as Liberator of nature (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans2005). Bergman uses contemporary ecological concerns as a hermeneutical tool to investigate the pneumatology of Gregory of Nazianzus. He portrays Gregory’s vision in terms of the Spirit’s inhabitation in creation. The cosmic horizon in which the drama of human salvation and the liberation of the crying earth are situated is the movement of the Spirit. This enables us to see a pattern in God’s work and to long for the perfection of God’s work of creation in synergy with all God’s creatures. He thus connects the trinitarian cosmology of Gregory with a contemporary ecological theology of liberation showing the continuity between the two and suggesting that such a notion of ‘creation set free’ may indeed be regarded as the authentic continuation of the classic ecumenical theology of the Cappadocians. He brings Gregory’s trinitarian cosmology within the boundaries of the contemporary reader in order to expand their horizon and to correlate Gregory’s views with ecological challenges.

21

Geiko Müller-FahrenholzGod’s Spirit transforming a world in crisis (New York: Continuum1995). Müller-Fahrenholz regards the Spirit as the “power-in-between-all-things” between the Father and Christ between the Creator and the cosmos. On this basis he explores the cosmic social (ecclesial) and personal dimensions of the transforming presence of the Spirit.

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