Representation of Post-Apartheid Social Reality after the Collapse of Racism in Nadine Gordimer’s No Time Like the Present

in Matatu
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

The essay demonstrates that a literary writer is not just an advocate for the ideal life but is also capable of reflecting how life could be lived by confronting potentially emergent social changes. Drawing on theoretical and methodological tools of Faircloughian critical discourse analysis and using Nadine Gordimer’s No Time Like the Present, a novel that represents post-apartheid social realities as its data source, the essay shows that, after the collapse of apartheid, many problems remain with which South Africa must contend. Gordimer shows that post-apartheid South Africa must gradually extract itself from the psychological fangs of apartheid and make the transition to democracy. She draws attention to the benefits of the repeal of the racist laws of the apartheid regime and the need for democratic governance to have direct impact on the people. The essay concludes that with another twenty years from now, a vision Gordimer tenaciously holds to in her narrative, post-apartheid South Africa should rank among other democratic nations.

Matatu

Journal for African Culture and Society

Sections

References

1

Nadine Gordimer, “Three in a Bed: Fiction, Morals, and Politics,” in African Literature: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory, ed. Tejumola Olaniyan & Ato Quayson (Oxford: Blackwell, 2007): 117.

3

Nadine Gordimer, No Time Like the Present (London: Bloomsbury, 2012): 17–18. Further page references are in the main text.

5

Anthony Giddens, Sociology (Cambridge: Polity, 2006): 524.

6

Melanie Walker, “Race is nowhere and Race is everywhere: Narratives from Black and White South African University Students in Post-Apartheid South Africa,” British Journal of Social Education 26.1 (February 2005): 49.

7

Wamuwi Mbao, “Inscribing whiteness and staging belonging in Contemporary Autobiographies and Life-Writing Forms,” English in Africa 37.1 (May 2101): 64.

8

Norman Fairclough, Language and Power (Harlow: Pearson Education, 1989).

10

Thomas Bloor & Meriel Bloor, The Functional Analysis of English: A Hallidayan Approach (London: Arnold, 1995).

12

Nadine Gordimer, “Three in a Bed: Fiction, Morals, and Politics,” in African Literature: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory, ed. Tejumola Olaniyan & Ato Quayson (Oxford: Blackwell, 2007): 117, 121.

13

Melanie Walker, “Race is nowhere and Race is everywhere,” 41–54.

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 11 11 5
Full Text Views 4 4 4
PDF Downloads 1 1 1
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0