“Standoffish” Policy-making: Inaction and Change in the Lebanese Response to the Syrian Displacement Crisis

in Middle East Law and Governance
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

With the largest refugee population per capita in the world, Lebanon now officially hosts at least 1.1 million Syrian refugees. Until late 2014, the Lebanese government maintained de facto open borders and little to no regulation of Syrians within its borders. This period has largely been understood as one of state absence: referred to broadly as a “policy of no-policy.” This paper looks at the way in which state inaction played a major role in structuring the responses that did emerge, both “below” and “above” the state, from local authorities and international agencies. I shed light on how indirect measures taken by the central government facilitated and encouraged greater local autonomy in governing the refugee presence. This, in turn, further decentralized and fragmented the current set of responses to the Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon and legitimized discretionary action by municipal authorities.

“Standoffish” Policy-making: Inaction and Change in the Lebanese Response to the Syrian Displacement Crisis

in Middle East Law and Governance

Sections

Figures

  • View in gallery

    Syrian refugees registered, by governorate (31 December 2014)

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 157 157 38
Full Text Views 131 131 81
PDF Downloads 12 12 4
EPUB Downloads 3 3 0