Ovid as a Hesiodic Poet: Atalanta in the Catalogue of Women (fr. 72-6 M-W) and the Metamorphoses (10.560-707)1)

in Mnemosyne
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Abstract

This article discusses the Hesiodic character of the Metamorphoses vis-à-vis the Homeric character of the Aeneid, taking as a case study the tale of Atalanta. On the one hand I focus on the intertextual dialogue between Homeric and Hesiodic epic, on the other I argue that the interplay between the Iliad and the Catalogue of Women (also known as theEhoiai) is reflected in Ovid’s Atalanta as a juxtaposition between the Aeneid and the Metamorphoses. Ovid’s references to the Catalogue, which have not been noticed by critics, evoke an intergeneric discourse between martial epic and ehoie-poetry.

Ovid as a Hesiodic Poet: Atalanta in the Catalogue of Women (fr. 72-6 M-W) and the Metamorphoses (10.560-707)1)

in Mnemosyne

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