Achilles Tatius and Chariton

Reflections and Refractions

In: Mnemosyne

Abstract

This article will explore the nature of intertextuality between Achilles Tatius and Chariton, by focusing on key instances of Achilles Tatius’ reflection and refraction of Chariton’s second-marriage theme. By considering allusions on the level of character-narrator and author, and by looking at verbal and thematic connections between these two novels, a view of generic interplay will emerge. In turn, the full implications of how Achilles Tatius positions himself vis-à-vis Chariton, and the subversive intentions of the later author will be fully addressed. The article will contribute to the growing debate regarding intertextuality in the Greek novels, and will add weight to the idea that these authors had generic self-consciousness. The literary ambition and imaginative ability of Achilles Tatius is also a key aspect, which comes to the fore in this article.

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