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Investigating Head Movements Induced by ‘Riloid’ Patterns in Migraine and Control Groups Using a Virtual Reality Display

In: Multisensory Research
Authors:
Louise O’Hare School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, LN6 7TS, UK

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Alex Sharp School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, LN6 7TS, UK

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Patrick Dickinson School of Computer Science, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, LN6 7TS, UK

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Graham Richardson School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, LN6 7TS, UK

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John Shearer School of Computer Science, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, LN6 7TS, UK

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Abstract

Certain striped patterns can induce illusory motion, such as those used in op-art. The visual system and the vestibular system work together closely, and so it is possible that illusory motion from a visual stimulus can result in uncertainty in the vestibular system. This increased uncertainty may be measureable in terms of the magnitude of head movements. Head movements were measured using a head-mounted visual display. Results showed that stimuli associated with illusory motion also seem to induce greater head movements when compared to similar stimuli. Individuals with migraine are more susceptible to visual discomfort, and this includes illusory motion from striped stimuli. However, there was no evidence of increased effect of illusory motion on those with migraine compared to those without, suggesting that while motion illusions may affect discomfort judgements, this is not limited to only those with migraine.

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