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Not Just Another Pint! The Role of Emotion Induced by Music on the Consumer’s Tasting Experience

In: Multisensory Research
Authors:
Felipe Reinoso-Carvalho School of Management, Universidad de los Andes, Calle 21 # 1-20, Edificio SD, Room SD-940, Bogotá, Colombia
Brain and Cognition, University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Tiensestraat 102 — box 3711, Leuven B-3000, Belgium

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Silvana Dakduk School of Management, Universidad de los Andes, Calle 21 # 1-20, Edificio SD, Room SD-940, Bogotá, Colombia

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Johan Wagemans Brain and Cognition, University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Tiensestraat 102 — box 3711, Leuven B-3000, Belgium

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Charles Spence Crossmodal Research Laboratory, University of Oxford, Anna Watts Building, Oxford, OX2 6GG, UK

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Abstract

We introduce a novel methodology to assess the influence of the emotion induced by listening to music on the consumer’s multisensory tasting experience. These crossmodal effects were analyzed when two contrasting music tracks (positive vs negative emotion) were presented to consumers while tasting beer. The results suggest that the emotional reactions triggered by the music influenced specific aspects of the multisensory tasting experience. Participants liked the beer more, and rated it as tasting sweeter, when listening to music associated with positive emotion. The same beer was rated as more bitter, with higher alcohol content, and as having more body, when the participants listened to music associated with negative emotion. Moreover, participants were willing to pay 7–8% more for the beer that was tasted while they listened to positive music. This novel methodology was subsequently replicated with two different styles of beer. These results are discussed along with practical implications concerning the way in which music can add significant value to how a consumer responds to a brand.

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