Save

Taste the Bass: Low Frequencies Increase the Perception of Body and Aromatic Intensity in Red Wine

In: Multisensory Research
Authors:
Jo BurzynskaUNSW Art and Design, Sydney, Australia

Search for other papers by Jo Burzynska in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Qian Janice WangDepartment of Food Science, Aarhus University, Årslev, Denmark
Crossmodal Research Laboratory, Oxford University, UK

Search for other papers by Qian Janice Wang in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Charles SpenceCrossmodal Research Laboratory, Oxford University, UK

Search for other papers by Charles Spence in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Susan Elaine Putnam BastianThe University of Adelaide, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Glen Osmond, Australia

Search for other papers by Susan Elaine Putnam Bastian in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Download Citation Get Permissions

Access options

Get access to the full article by using one of the access options below.

Institutional Login

Log in with Open Athens, Shibboleth, or your institutional credentials

Login via Institution

Purchase

Buy instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

$34.95

Abstract

Associations between heaviness and bass/low-pitched sounds reverberate throughout music, philosophy, literature, and language. Given that recent research into the field of cross-modal correspondences has revealed a number of robust relationships between sound and flavour, this exploratory study was designed to investigate the effects of lower frequency sound (10 Hz to 200 Hz) on the perception of the mouthfeel character of palate weight/body. This is supported by an overview of relevant cross-modal studies and cultural production. Wines were the tastants — a New Zealand Pinot Noir and a Spanish Garnacha — which were tasted in silence and with a 100 Hz (bass) and a higher 1000 Hz sine wave tone. Aromatic intensity was included as an additional character given suggestions that pitch may influence the perception of aromas, which might presumably affect the perception of wine body. Intensity of acidity and liking were also evaluated. The results revealed that the Pinot Noir wine was rated as significantly fuller-bodied when tasted with a bass frequency than in silence or with a higher frequency sound. The low frequency stimulus also resulted in the Garnacha wine being rated as significantly more aromatically intense than when tasted in the presence of the higher frequency auditory stimulus. Acidity was rated considerably higher with the higher frequency in both wines by those with high wine familiarity and the Pinot Noir significantly better liked than the Garnacha. Possible reasons as to why the tones used in this study affected perception of the two wines differently are discussed. Practical application of the findings are also proposed.

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1725 371 46
Full Text Views 115 20 0
PDF Views & Downloads 126 29 0