Suppressive effect of black oat, Avena strigosa, KH1a on Meloidogyne spp.

in Nematology
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Summary

The suppressive effect of a black oat, Avena strigosa, breeding line KH1a on Meloidogyne spp. was examined in pot tests and on Meloidogyne incognita in pot and field tests. In pot tests, roots of black oats were examined 42-46 days after inoculation of 500 second-stage juveniles. There were significantly fewer egg masses on the roots of KH1a than on 12 black oat cultivars examined. KH1a was a poor host for four isolates of M. incognita, two isolates of M. arenaria and one isolate of M. javanica, and a non-host for one isolate of M. hapla. The effect of autumn and spring cropping of KH1a on soil nematode density was examined in M. incognita-infested fields. Nematode density after autumn cropping of KH1a was significantly lower than that after susceptible black oat, resulting in significantly lower Pf/Pi in KH1a (0.10 and 0.13) than in susceptible black oat (0.42 and 0.74). Damage indices of the succeeding crop, sweet potato, were significantly lower in KH1a plots than in susceptible black oat plots. In spring cropping, there were significantly fewer soil nematodes in KH1a plots than in susceptible black oat plots 3 weeks after cultivation. In both autumn and spring cropping, there was no significant difference in soil nematode density between KH1a and bare fallow. These results suggested that KH1a is a good alternative to current susceptible cultivars for the management of M. incognita.

Suppressive effect of black oat, Avena strigosa, KH1a on Meloidogyne spp.

in Nematology

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References

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Figures

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    Number of egg masses of Meloidogyne incognita (Nishigoshi isolate) per plant on KH1a and black oat (Avena strigosa) cultivars.

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    Soil temperature at 15 cm depth during field tests 1-3.

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    Number of egg masses on the roots of tested KH1a and Avena strigosa ‘Hay oats’, A. sativa ‘Sniper’ and Solanum lycopersicum ‘Pritz’ cultivars inoculated with 500 second-stage juveniles of Meloidogyne incognita isolates.

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    Number of egg masses on the roots of tested KH1a and Avena strigosa ‘Hay oats’, A. sativa ‘Sniper’ and Solanum lycopersicum ‘Pritz’ cultivars inoculated with 500 second-stage juveniles of Meloidogyne arenaria, M. hapla and M. javanica isolates.

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    Population fluctuation of root-knot nematodes in 20 g soil (A: test 1, B: test 2, autumn cropping). Mean ± SE of five replicates. Bars with the same letter do not differ significantly (P<0.05) according to Tukey HSD test with Box-Cox transformed data. J2 = second-stage juveniles.

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    Pf/Pi of Meloidogyne incognita in three field tests of black oat (Avena strigosa).

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    Number of egg masses per g fresh root and eggs per egg mass of Meloidogyne incognita produced on roots of oats at the end of cultivation in field tests 1, 2 (autumn cropping) and 3 (spring cropping). Mean ± SE of 7-8 replicates. No egg mass was observed in KH1a in test 3. Bars with the same letter do not differ significantly at the 5% level according to Tukey HSD test with Box-Cox transformed data.

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    Damage index caused by Meloidogyne incognita and fresh storage root weight of the sweet potato crop following oats in field test 1. Mean ± SE of five replicates. Asterisk indicates a significant difference from KH1a at 5% level according to the Steel test.

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    Population fluctuation of Meloidogyne incognita in 20 g soil (field test 3, spring cropping). Mean ± SE of five replicates. Bars with the same letter do not differ significantly (P<0.05) according to Tukey HSD test with Box-Cox transformed data. J2 = second-stage juveniles.

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