Paul and the Stoic Theory of οἰκείωσις

A Response to Troels Engberg-Pedersen

in Novum Testamentum
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Three points serve as the backbone of Engberg-Pedersen’s interpretation of the social kind of oikeiōsis in Stoicism: (1) rejection of the role of the cosmic nature as a normative premise in oikeiōsis; (2) exclusive stress on the self-reflexive dimension in oikeiōsis; (3) taking the change in one’s view of oneself and other people to be the heart of oikeiōsis. However, none of these is convincing when examined closely. We have also seen that Engberg-Pedersen’s treatment of Paul is insufficient both in its methodological refinement and in exegesis. Engberg-Pedersen’s comparison is dyadic and imbalanced. Moreover, it fails to grasp the complexities and intricacies of Paul’s view of the Jewish customs, the Law, scriptural traditions, and other culturally conditioned social norms.

Paul and the Stoic Theory of οἰκείωσις

A Response to Troels Engberg-Pedersen

in Novum Testamentum

Sections

References

2

Troels Engberg-PedersenPaul and the Stoics (Louisville: Westminster/John Knox2000).

5

Troels Engberg-PedersenThe Stoic Theory of Oikeiosis: Moral Development and Social Interaction in Early Stoic Philosophy (Aarhus, Denmark: Aarhus University1990).

7

Ibid.35.

9

Ibid.34.

14

Engberg-PedersenThe Stoic Theory of Oikeiosis125.

23

Ibid.244n.8.

24

Ibid.70. Italics his.

25

Julia AnnasThe Morality of Happiness (Oxford: Oxford University Press1993).

30

Ibid.46.

37

So Brad Inwood“Stoic Ethics,” in The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy (ed. K. Algra et al.; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1999) 676: “Both human and cosmic nature serve as the foundations and first principles of Stoics ethics. . . . [H]uman and cosmic nature are related as part to whole.”

40

Translation by Raphael WoolfOn Moral Ends (ed. Julia Annas and trans. R. Woolf; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press2001) with slight change and Latin added.

50

Ibid.148. His emphasis.

51

J.Z. SmithDrudgery Divine: On the Comparison of Early Christianities and the Religions of Late Antiquity (Chicago: University of Chicago Press1990) 108.

53

Alan SegalPaul the Convert: The Apostolate and Apostasy of Saul the Pharisee (New Heaven and London: Yale University Press1990) 75.

57

SmithDrudgery Divine43.

58

Ibid.51.

62

Raymond F. CollinsFirst Corinthians (Sacra Pagina; Collegeville: Liturgical Press1999) 407.

63

Cf. Dale B. MartinThe Corinthian Body (New Haven: Yale1995) 199: “[Paul’s] writings confirms the Greco-Roman gender hierarchy . . . [T]the physiology of gender dominant in Greco-Roman society . . . is taken over by Paul as an unquestionable given.”

65

Ibid.172. My emphasis.

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 11 11 10
Full Text Views 12 12 12
PDF Downloads 3 3 3
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0