Introduction

Aspects of the Production and Circulation of Early Modern Scientiae: Religion, Natural Philosophy, Secrecy, and Openness

In: Nuncius
View More View Less
  • 1 University of Padova, University of Oxford

Purchase instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

€25.00$30.00

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

  • 2

    John Hedley Brooke, Science and Religion. Some Historical Perspectives (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), especially pp. 1–116. The literature on the relationship of science to religion is vast, and the issue is intimately connected to that of individual freedom. The Faraday Institute, the Liberty Fund, and many such organisations, both academic and scholarly-inclined, provide exhaustive and updated bibliographies on the subject on their websites, together with online resources such as lectures and e-books. See, for instance, http://www.faraday.st-edmunds.cam.ac.uk/; http://oll.libertyfund.org/ (accessed 1 November 2015).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3

    Ian Maclean, “The Medical Republic of Letters before the Thirty Years War,” Intellectual History Review, 2008, 18: 15–30; Nancy Siraisi, Communities of Learned Experience. Epistolary Medicine in the Renaissance (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4

    Tara Nummedal, Art and Authority in the Holy Roman Empire (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2007).

  • 5

    Scott Mandelbrote, “ ‘A duty of the greatest moment’: Isaac Newton and the Writing of Biblical Criticism,” The British Journal for the History of Science, 1993, 26:281–302; Stephen D. Snobelen, “ ‘God of Gods and Lord of the Lords’: The Theology of Isaac Newton’s General Scholium to the Principia,” Osiris, 2001, 16:169–208.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7

    Yves Gingras, “Mapping the Structure of the Intellectual Field using Citation and Co-citation Analysis of Correspondences,” History of European Ideas, 2010, 26:330–339. For a bibliography about the Republic of Letters, http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=191 (accessed 15 October 2015).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11

    Anne Goldgar, Impolite Learning: Conduct and Community in the Republic of Letters, 1680–1750 (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12

    Jason Rampelt, “Res Publica Mathematica: One State or Many?,” in Antiquarianism and Science in Early Modern Urban Networks, edited by Vittoria Feola (Paris: STP Blanchard, 2014), pp. 1–32.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13

    Ute Frevert (ed.), Vertrauen. Historische Annährungen (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprech, 2003).

  • 16

    Ann Blair, “Reading Strategies for Coping with Information Overload, ca. 1550–1700,” Journal for the History of Ideas, 2003, 64/1:11–28.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 140 30 1
Full Text Views 139 1 0
PDF Downloads 10 2 0