The Ignatian Mystic and the Isaiah Scholar: A Response to John Goldingay’s The Theology of the Book of Isaiah

in Journal of Pentecostal Theology
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In and with the many rich gifts it affords, John Goldingay’s theology of Isaiah forces a series of pressing questions about the nature of Scripture as witness to Christ and the Christian gospel as well as about the character and purpose of Christian readings of the Hebrew Scriptures and the place of Christian doctrine in the practice of faithful interpretation. This paper attempts not only to draw attention to these questions but also to show why they matter and to provide at least the beginnings of an alternative approach to reading Isaiah and other ot texts, largely through appeal to other of Goldingay’s works.

The Ignatian Mystic and the Isaiah Scholar: A Response to John Goldingay’s The Theology of the Book of Isaiah

in Journal of Pentecostal Theology

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References

4

 See Brevard S. ChildsBiblical Theology: A Proposal (Minneapolis: Fortress Press2002) p. 1.

6

Goldingay‘Biblical Narrative and Systematic Theology’ p. 132.

7

Goldingay‘Biblical Narrative and Systematic Theology’ p. 132.

9

 But see John Goldingay‘Isaiah 53 in the Pulpit’Perspectives in Religious Studies 35.2 (Sum 2008) pp. 147–53 which offers a typological reading of the passage.

13

David Steinmetz‘John Calvin on Isaiah 6: A Problem in the History of Exegesis’Interpretation 36.2 (1982) pp. 156–70 (p. 163). ‘The Christian commentators feel themselves bound by John 12:41 to regard the theophany as in some sense a revelation of Christ and by Acts 28:25–26 to regard the voice which speaks to Isaiah as the voice of the Holy Spirit. Coupling these verses with the threefold sanctus the Pauline and Johannine notions that the Son is the image of the Father and the trinitarian traditions of Christian theology most Christian commentators – including Calvin – conclude that the vision is a vision of Christ; but a vision which involves in one way or another the whole Trinity. Only Zwingli among the early Protestants keeps his options open by calling it a vision of an image type form or even sacrament of God. Calvin argues that while Isaiah saw the glory of Christ what he saw cannot be limited to the Person of Christ since the word Adonai ("Lord") is applied to God "in an absolute and unrestricted manner".’

16

Kendall R. SoulenThe Divine Name(s) and the Holy Trinity: Distinguishing the Voices (Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press2011).

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