US–Russian Strategic Relations and the Structuration of Central Asia

in Perspectives on Global Development and Technology
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Abstract

Central Asia is only one of the core regional subsystems of international relations that constitute Central Eurasia. The others are Southwest Asia and South Asia. All three subsystems are mutually distinct and do not intersect. The years 1989-1994 saw the geopolitical enlargement of Southwest Asia into Greater Southwest Asia; 1995-2000, that of Central Asia into Greater Central Asia; and 2001-2006, that of South Asia into Greater South Asia. These "Greater" complements overlap, and their intersection is key to the future of international relations in Greater Central Asia and Central Eurasia as a whole. It is through their matrix that powers such as Russia and the United States (as well as China, India, Iran, Turkey) play out their search for influence in Central Asia proper.

US–Russian Strategic Relations and the Structuration of Central Asia

in Perspectives on Global Development and Technology

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