‘Wer Socinianische Bücher sucht, findet sie bey ihm am ehesten’

Sebastiaan Petzold’s Patrons

in Quaerendo
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Abstract

The microhistory of the Amsterdam-based Sebastiaan Petzold († 1704) demonstrates that in the Early Modern Period booksellers without a network were hardly able to manage professionally in the Republic of Letters. Petzold relied especially on patronage from Socinianist circles. The Socinian theologian Samuel Crellius (1660-1747) saw to it that Petzold was able to publish three highly controversial Socinian works, including the notorious Platonisme devoilé (1700). Petzold was also introduced to some prominent English booksellers thanks to Crell, which provided him with access to the international market. Another patron was the Berlin court preacher Daniel Ernst Jablonski (1660-1741), who recommended Petzold to Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. In Amsterdam the literary society ‘In Magnis Voluisse Sat Est’ commissioned Petzold to publish the complete works of Lucretius, an Epicurean work which was a favourite in anti-clerical circles. In spite of this support, in the end Petzold was besieged by creditors, instead of authors thronging at his door.

‘Wer Socinianische Bücher sucht, findet sie bey ihm am ehesten’

Sebastiaan Petzold’s Patrons

in Quaerendo

Sections

Figures

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    Portrait of Faustus Socinus Senensis (from Siena). Anonymous engraving. British Museum Collection Bb,13.565
  • View in gallery
    Portrait of Gottlieb Stolle. Engraving by Johann Friedrich Rosbach, from Gottlieb Stolles Anleitung zur Historie der Gelahrtheit, vol. 1 (Jena, Johann Meyer Erben 1736). Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Collection RP-P-1921-1842
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    The stained-glass artist David Joris (1501-1556) sympathised with the Sacramentarians, a movement holding a variant interpretation of the Eucharist, like the Socinians. He belonged to the Radical Reformation and was banished from Holland as a heretic. His followers were also persecuted. Engraving by Romeyn de Hooghe. From: Godfried Arnold, Historie der Kerken en ketteren (Amsterdam, Sebastiaan Petzold 1701). Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Collection RP-P-1907-3141
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    Title page of the notorious Platonisme devoilé (1700), which was placed in Petzold’s care thanks to Samuel Crell. Universiteit van Amsterdam, Special Collections OTM: OK 61-273
  • View in gallery
    Title page for the first pamphlet in the collection: Esopus in Europa (Amsterdam, Sebastiaan Petzold 1701). The tiger (France), with the arms of Spain between its paws, is standing next to the coffin of Charles II of Spain. A unicorn (England), a lion (Holland) and a cat (Southern Netherlands) are on the right. Etching by Romeyn de Hooghe. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Collection BI-B-FM-037-1
  • View in gallery
    Frontispiece of De werken van T. Lucretius Carus van het heelal (the works of T. Lucretius Carus on the Universe) (Amsterdam, Sebastiaan Petzold 1702), prose translation by Joan de Witt, member of the literary society In Magnis Voluisse Sat Est. An allegorical female figure with a heart on her breast, a book and lyre in her lap and a large letter Y in her right hand is sitting next to a socle with a globe and a bust. Etching by Romeyn de Hooghe. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Collection RP-P-1907-4583

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