“Palestine Sits in Sackcloth and Ashes”: Reading Mark Twain’s The Innocents Abroad as a Protestant Holy Land Narrative

in Religion and the Arts
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Abstract

Among the vast array of priceless treasures in the collection of Jerusalem’s Armenian Patriarchate is a votive portrait of a local Jerusalem saint, the priest Hanna, a native son of Jerusalem’s Armenian community. The existence of the portrait is all but unknown, despite the fact that its subject has inspired generations of Jerusalem monks to dedicate their lives to the service of the Sts. James. As vicar to Jerusalem’s Patriarch Grigor IV Shirvants‘i (Shght‘ayakir) Hanna was instrumental in reviving the fortunes of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, which, in the early eighteenth century, had suffered a near-total eclipse. Although Hanna died before the age of forty, the many activities of his short career included such major achievements as the renovation of the Armenian sections of the Holy Sepulchre Church and the transformation of the Patriarchate compound into a fully enclosed and self-sufficient enclave.

“Palestine Sits in Sackcloth and Ashes”: Reading Mark Twain’s The Innocents Abroad as a Protestant Holy Land Narrative

in Religion and the Arts

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