Captured at a Glance

The Dutch Image of Islam According to an Early Nineteenth Century Picture

in Religion and the Arts
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This article focuses on the picture “Moroccans,” by Jacques Kuyper, in Martinus Stuart’s work. Although the picture of the “Moroccans” does not have any special art-historical value, it is interesting as a document-cum-monument that tells a fascinating story about another tipping point with regard to the image of Islam in Dutch history. “Moroccans” conveys a message that a twenty-first-century beholder cannot, or can no longer, grasp at a glance. This message cannot be understood unless the picture itself, as well as Martinus Stuart’s comment to it, is studied, and both are interpreted in their own socio-historical context.

Captured at a Glance

The Dutch Image of Islam According to an Early Nineteenth Century Picture

in Religion and the Arts

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    Figure 1

    “Moroccans.” Martinus Stuart, De mensch zoo als hij voorkomt op den bekenden aardbol. Images: Jacques Kuyper. 6 parts. Amsterdam: Johannes Allart, 1802–1807.Picture in private collection

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    Figure 2

    “Moroccans.” Martinus Stuart, De mensch zoo als hij voorkomt op den bekenden aardbol. Images: Jacques Kuyper. 6 parts. Amsterdam: Johannes Allart, 1802–1807.Picture in private collection

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    Figure 3

    “Egyptians.” Martinus Stuart, De mensch zoo als hij voorkomt op den bekenden aardbol. Images: Jacques Kuyper. 6 parts. Amsterdam: Johannes Allart, 1802–1807.

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    Figure 4

    “Turkish woman smoking.” Jean Baptiste Vanmour, Recueil de cent estampes representant differentes nations du Levant tirees sur les tableaux peints d’ après Nature en 1707, et 1708 par les Ordres de Mr. de Ferriol ambassadeur du Roi a la Porte, et gravées en 1712, et 1713 par les soins de M. Le Hay. Paris, 1714.

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    Figure 5

    “Entertainment in the harem.” Vivant Dominique Denon, Voyage dans la Basse et la Haute Égypte pendant les campagnes de Bonaparte en 1798 et 1799. Paris: P. Didot, 1802, vol. 2, plate 112.

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