Reflections on Opportunities for Comparative Private Law in Academia: Central and Eastern Europe

in Review of Central and East European Law
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While in theory the great didactic benefits of teaching comparative private law in legal education have generally rarely been denied, the implementation of comparative private law in academic curricula has proven to be a persistent challenge—both in terms of the mode and the degree of implementation. In Central and Eastern Europe, the comparative private law boat has recently been bouncing on especially rough seas: although comparative law formally is still included in the curricula in many places, it is in fact being avoided more and more by both teachers and students as a subject in post-socialist states. The reversion of this development may not be easy, but it is far from impossible, as there are—to my mind—far more tools enhancing the teaching of comparative law (be it in didactic, structural or financial terms) than generally assumed. In this article, I would like to present some of them.

Reflections on Opportunities for Comparative Private Law in Academia: Central and Eastern Europe

in Review of Central and East European Law

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