Charlie the Freethinker: Religion, Blasphemy, and Decent Controversy

in Religion & Human Rights
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

This comment examines the tension between freedom of expression and freedom of religion by embedding the Charlie Hebdo cartoons in a wider, century-old European tradition of publications mocking religion, including Christianity. It describes, and draws lessons from, the 19th century blasphemy case against the British Freethinker newspaper, whose “technique of offense” was similar to that of Charlie Hebdo. Finally, the comment tackles the problem of violent response to text or images that mock religion, pointing out that malicious intermediaries often carry such messages between social groups or across national borders—greatly escalating the risk of violence.

Charlie the Freethinker: Religion, Blasphemy, and Decent Controversy

in Religion & Human Rights

Sections

References

4

Philip Gourevitch‘The Pen vs. the Gun’The New Yorker8 January 2015 available at <www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/pen-vs-gun-charlie-hebdo> accessed 11 October 2015.

5

G.W. Foote (ed.)Comic Bible Sketches Reprinted from ‘The Freethinker’ (London: Progressive Publishing Company1885) available at <www.gutenberg.org/files/30210/30210-h/30210-h.htm> 11 October 2015.

11

Ibid. p. 736.

13

Ibid. p. 737.

14

Christopher Massie‘The Missing Charlie Hebdo Cartoons’Columbia Journalism Review8 January 2015 available at <www.cjr.org/watchdog/charlie_hebdo_cartoons.php> 12 October 2015.

15

Stefan Simons“Charlie Hebdo” Editor in Chief: “A Drawing Has Never Killed Anyone”Der Spiegel20 September 2012 available at <www.spiegel.de/international/europe/charlie-hebdo-editor-in-chief-on-muhammad-cartoons-a-856891.html> 12 October 2015.

16

Jason Abbruzzese‘What is Charlie Hebdo? Behind the covers of the French satirical magazine targeted in deadly attack’Mashable7 January 2015 available at <www.mashable.com/2015/01/07/charlie-hebdo-magazine/#YOuptZLQtGqx> 12 October 2015.

18

Jimmy Nsubuga‘Charlie Hebdo criticised for controversial Alan Kurdi cartoon but did most people miss the point?’Metro15 September 2015 available at 12 October 2015.

19

Salil Tripathi‘A bonfire of our pomposity’Live Mint23 September 2015 available at <www.livemint.com/Opinion/xB5gIUfUV98bJcqBtPqlQL/A-bonfire-of-our-pomposity.html> 12 October 2015.

21

Christopher Hitchens‘Cartoon Debate: The case for mocking religion’Slate4 February 2006 available at <www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/fighting_words/2006/02/cartoon_debate.html> 12 October 2015.

28

Brian Stelter‘A Fringe Pastor, a Fiery Stunt and the Media Spotlight’s Glare’The New York Times 10 September 2010 available at 12 October 2015.

29

Susan Benesch and Rebecca MacKinnon‘The Innocence of YouTube’Foreign Policy5 October 2012 available at

30

Angelique Chrisafis‘Charlie Hebdo attackers: Born, raised, and radicalised in Paris’The Guardian12 January 2015 available at <www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/12/-sp-charlie-hebdo-attackers-kids-france-radicalised-paris> 11 October 2015.

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 28 28 3
Full Text Views 4 4 4
PDF Downloads 2 2 2
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0