The Legal Obligations of State and Non-State Actors in Respect of the Protection of Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion or Belief

in Religion & Human Rights
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

In this article, the author examines the consequences of the recent recognition of the idea that not only States but also non-State actors can violate human rights. While this development can help in defining the positive obligations of States concerning the protection of freedom of religion or belief, it can also undermine its protection. In particular, the author warns against implications for State interference with what used to be the internal affairs of religious communities. Whereas positive State obligations concerning the acts of non-State actors can be relatively easily established in the case of clear criminal offences, it is much more difficult to establish these in the case of conflicts between various human rights. The author therefore concludes that a new comment by the Human Rights Committee is called for to clarify the implications of these new legal developments.

The Legal Obligations of State and Non-State Actors in Respect of the Protection of Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion or Belief

in Religion & Human Rights

Sections

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 6 6 3
Full Text Views 5 5 5
PDF Downloads 4 4 4
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0