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Online submission: Articles for publication in Journal of Religious Minorities under Muslim Rule can be submitted online through Editorial Manager. To submit an article, click here.

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Editors-in-Chief
Abbas Aghdassi, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran
Aaron Hughes, University of Rochester, New York, USA

Editorial Board
Phillip Lieberman, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA
Samim Akgönül, Strasbourg University, France
Febe Armanios, Middlebury College, Vermont, USA
Orit Bashkin, University of Chicago, USA
Sargon Donabed, Roger Williams University, Bristol, Rhode Island, USA
Maribel Fierro, CCHS, Spain
Saloumeh Gholami, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Daryoush Mohammad Poor, Institute of Ismaili Studies, London, UK
Ali Usman Qasmi, LUMS, Lahore, Pakistan
Barbara Roggema, University of Florence, Italy
Jack Tannous, Princeton University, USA
The Journal of Religious Minorities under Muslim Rule provides a primary venue for scholarly studies that examine religious minorities (such as Christians, Jews, Zoroastrians, Hindus, and other minoritarian Muslim groups) under majoritarian Muslim rule. The journal covers a large temporal period, spanning from 7th century Arabia to 1922 (the end of Ottoman rule), in addition to a large geographic area from North Africa and al-Andalus in the West to Iran, some Central Asian lands, well into Pakistan, Bangladesh, Malaysia, and Indonesia in the East. The focus includes minority-minority, minority-majority, and minority-state relations. In addition to its broad temporal and geographic reach, this is an interdisciplinary journal which will appeal to those working in specific disciplines, including history, religious studies, literature, legal studies, and archaeology.

The journal welcomes original papers and review essays that focus on any temporal and geographic areas. We are particularly interested in, but not limited to, papers that:
• offer an inter-/multi-disciplinary approach to the topic
• re-examine monolithic view(s) on minorities and their status
• analyze minority relations as dynamic, fluid, and every-changing

The following questions are of particular interest:
• What can we learn about the complexity of Islam and Muslims from understanding the minorities in its and their midst?
• What do we learn about these minoritarian traditions from their existence within a larger Muslim environment?

SUBMIT YOUR PAPER
We would like to invite all authors to submit their papers directly to the editors-in-chief, Abbas Aghdassi (aghdassi@um.ac.ir) & Aaron W. Hughes (aaron.hughes@rochester.edu). If you have any questions before submitting, please contact us.

Journal of Religious Minorities under Muslim Rule

The Journal of Religious Minorities under Muslim Rule provides a primary venue for scholarly studies that examine religious minorities (such as Christians, Jews, Zoroastrians, Hindus, and other minoritarian Muslim groups) under majoritarian Muslim rule. The journal covers a large temporal period, spanning from 7th century Arabia to 1922 (the end of Ottoman rule), in addition to a large geographic area from North Africa and al-Andalus in the West to Iran, some Central Asian lands, well into Pakistan, Bangladesh, Malaysia, and Indonesia in the East. The focus includes minority-minority, minority-majority, and minority-state relations. In addition to its broad temporal and geographic reach, this is an interdisciplinary journal which will appeal to those working in specific disciplines, including history, religious studies, literature, legal studies, and archaeology.
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