Mapping Interdisciplinary Communication Between the Disciplines of Religion and Public Health in the Context of HIV/AIDS in Africa

in Religion and Theology
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While there has been a massive surge of interest and grey literature publication on religion and development and religion and health, especially at an international advocacy level, the academic disciplinary processes for such work remains poorly clarified – and largely uncritical. This paper examines the interdisciplinary intersection of religion and public health (using the example of research on HIV/AIDS in Africa), and considers lingering clashes of disciplinary cultures and power that continue to make collaboration in this space a challenge.

Mapping Interdisciplinary Communication Between the Disciplines of Religion and Public Health in the Context of HIV/AIDS in Africa

in Religion and Theology

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References

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