The Higgs Boson, Creation and “Truth”

In Search of a Common Understanding

in Religion and Theology
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In this article the latest developments in particle physics form the basis for rethinking their implications for a religious doctrine of creation. The assumption is that scientific insights that are accepted on solid grounds will influence belief, but will not replace or terminate it. Some aspects of particle physics provide a background to explain the importance of the discovery of the Higgs boson. The question is: can science serve as the final explicator of the world? After looking at the role of metaphysics and truth in science, we briefly consider some unsuccessful attempts to assign God a demonstrable place in physical reality. Would that necessarily imply a creator God? The role of belief in creation in the origin and development of religions is traced in order to determine whether religions entailing such a belief are viable, with due regard to the impact of worldview and evolution on the doctrines of creation and God. In conclusion we look at the distinctive contribution of religion to human life with reference to the role of emotion and affect.

Religion and Theology

A Journal of Contemporary Religious Discourse

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References

1

Sean Carroll, “Why (almost all) Cosmologists are Atheists,” Faith and Philosophy 22 (2005): 622; Sean Carroll, The Particle at the End of the Universe. The Hunt for the Higgs and the Discovery of a New World (London: Oneworld, 2012), 5. CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research based in Meyrin, Switzerland, and whose purpose is to operate the world’s largest particle physics laboratory. The laboratory includes the Large Hadron Collider.

7

Kane, Supersymmetry, 39.

10

Carroll, Particle, 53.

11

Mark, W. Worthing, God, Creation and Contemporary Physics (Minneapolis, Minn.: Fortress, 1996), 95–96.

12

Worthing, God Creation, 96. Also see Kane, Supersymmetry, 40.

18

See Kane, Supersymmetry, 24–25.

22

Carroll, Particle, 27.

23

Philip Clayton, God and Contemporary Science (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1997), 144.

28

Carroll, Particle, 22–23.

31

Kane, Supersymmetry, 2.

33

Grassie, New Sciences, 190.

34

Worthing, God Creation, 107.

35

Carroll, “Why (Almost All) Cosmologists are Atheists,” 11–12.

42

Tillich, History, 373.

43

Tillich, History, 374.

52

Gijs, D.J. Dingemans, De stem van de roepende (Kampen: Kok, 2001), 137.

54

Dingemans, De stem, 136.

55

Dingemans, De stem, 136.

56

Dingemans, De stem, 136.

57

Clayton, God and Contemporary Physics, 37–38.

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