BECKETT, GERMAN FASCISM, AND HISTORY: The Futility of Protest

in Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Accessing his letters and German diaries, this article argues that Beckett changes his aesthetic response to the rise of fascism during and after his trip to Nazi Germany in 1936-37. Before the trip Beckett satirises a stereotypical modernism's inability to counter the rise of totalitarianism; when confronted with Nazi totalising narratives of art and history, however, Beckett reevaluates the capacity of modernism to frustrate increasingly irrational fascist narratives. He even posits his German diaries as a documentary alternative to fascist histories. Not until he returns, however, does Beckett manage to formulate in his creative work a satisfying aesthetic response.

BECKETT, GERMAN FASCISM, AND HISTORY: The Futility of Protest

in Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 25 25 8
Full Text Views 60 60 54
PDF Downloads 11 11 9
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0