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Death of a Companion Cat or Dog and Human Bereavement: Psychosocial Variables

In: Society & Animals
Authors:
Shelley Stokes
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Lynn Planchon
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Donald Templer
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Jacqueline Keller
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Abstract

This study found that death depression, general depression, and positive attitudes toward, and attachment to, companion animals were associated with greater grief following the death of cats and dogs both in a veterinary client group who had recently lost their companion animals and in a college student group with a history of companion animal loss. The correlations of both the above variables and the demographic and death circumstance variables tended to be higher with the veterinary clients. Death of a dog by accident as opposed to illness correlated .81 with extended grief in the veterinary clients. Not having their dogs euthanized correlated .70 with extended grief in this group as well.

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