Save

Dolphins in Popular Literature and Media

In: Society & Animals
Authors:
Diana Reiss
Search for other papers by Diana Reiss in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jessica Sickler
Search for other papers by Jessica Sickler in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Sarah Gruber
Search for other papers by Sarah Gruber in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Paul Boyle
Search for other papers by Paul Boyle in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Elizabeth Elliott
Search for other papers by Elizabeth Elliott in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Katherine Lemcke
Search for other papers by Katherine Lemcke in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
John Fraser
Search for other papers by John Fraser in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Barbara Newman
Search for other papers by Barbara Newman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Download Citation Get Permissions

Access options

Get access to the full article by using one of the access options below.

Institutional Login

Log in with Open Athens, Shibboleth, or your institutional credentials

Login via Institution

Purchase

Buy instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

$34.95

Abstract

This review of how dolphins are portrayed in popular media (including literature, film, television, and music) reveals four themes that may influence public acceptance of current scientific research into dolphin cognition. These themes are: (a) dolphin as peer to humans, of equal intelligence or at least capable of communicating with or helping humans; (b) the dolphin as the representation of a romantic notion of ideal freedom in nature, embodying principles of peace, harmony or love; (c) the dolphin as a naïve, innocent being that is subordinate and in need of human protection; and (d) the dolphin as superior to humans, potentially affiliating with a higher power or intelligence. This review revealed that the use of dolphins in humor reinforced or lampooned the four identified themes, indicating a common acceptance of these themes. The paper concludes with a discussion of the importance of considering popular narratives in the presentation of scientific research results.

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1108 424 49
Full Text Views 197 41 5
PDF Views & Downloads 200 65 8