When Neglect Isn’t Working Anymore: The Unlikely Success of the Tuxedo Party

In: Society & Animals
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  • 1 Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
  • 2 Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
  • 3 Carleton University Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Abstract

In 2012, Tuxedo Stan, a domestic long-hair cat, “ran for mayor” of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and a year later Stan’s brother, Earl Grey, “ran for premier” of Nova Scotia. What separated Stan and Earl Grey (who ran under the banner of the Tuxedo Party) from other politically minded felines was that the Tuxedo Party campaigns were not stunt or joke campaigns. While the cats could obviously not take office, the two campaigns were nonetheless political advocacy campaigns, with a clearly articulated message to make life better for feral and stray cats. This paper argues that the Tuxedo Party successfully elevated the issue onto the political agenda through their savvy mix of social media, and the use of positive imagery of cats in their campaigns.

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