Tainted Love: The Trials and Tribulations of a Career in Animal Studies

in Society & Animals
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?

Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.

Help

 

Have Institutional Access?

Login with your institution. Any other coaching guidance?

Connect

Abstract

Developing an academic career can be exciting, rewarding and stimulating. It can also be challenging, disheartening, and highly insecure. Results from a survey of Animal Studies (AS) scholars identifies reasons why pursuing a career in AS might generate additional challenges, over and above those experienced by academics generally. For example, 44 percent of respondents stated that in their view, undertaking research in AS “creates challenges for an academic career.” This is compared to just 16 percent who thought that it is an advantage. Yet despite the challenges, there is much that is positive about AS. Participants described being in “dialogue with clever colleagues,” viewed their work as “totally engaging,” and reported feeling “morally useful.” This in turn affords AS scholars an authenticity that may be of long-term benefit in the competitive and constantly transforming world of higher education.

Sections
References
  • AaltolaE. (2011). The philosophy behind the movement: Animal studies versus animal rights. Society & Animals19393-406.

  • Animals and Society Institute. (n.d.). Human-animal studies courses. Retrieved from http://www.animalsandsociety.org/human-animal-studies/courses/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ARC. (2017). ARC major grants announced. Retrieved from http://www.arc.gov.au/news-media/news/arcs-major-grants-announced.

  • ArcherL. (2008). Younger academics’ constructions of ‘authenticity’, ‘success’ and professional identity. Studies in Higher Education33(4) 385-403.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • BergL. D.HuijbensE. H. & LarsenH. G. (2016). Producing anxiety in the neoliberal university. Canadian Geographer/Le Géographe canadien60(2) 168-180.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • BlackP. (2005). Class matters in UK HE. Women’s Studies International Forum28(2-3) 127-138.

  • BodenR. & EpsteinD. (2011). A flat earth society? Imagining academic freedom. The Sociological Review59(3) 476-495.

  • BundsK. S. & GiardinaM. D. (2017). Navigating the corporate university: Reflections on the politics of research in neoliberal times. Cultural Studies—Critical Methodologies17(3) 227-235.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ButterwickS. & DawsonJ. (2005). Undone business: Examining the production of academic labour. Women’s Studies International Forum28(1) 51-65.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • CleaveJ. V. (2017). I am Nel: Becoming (in)coherent scholars in neoliberal times. Cultural Studies—Critical Methodologies17(3) 251-261.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • CleggS. (2008). Academic identities under threat? British Educational Research Journal34(3) 329-345.

  • CNG Law. (2017). Animals and the law. Retrieved from https://www.cnglaw.com.au/wp-content/uploads/Animals-and-the-Law.pdf.

  • CourtoisA. & O’KeefeT. (2015). Precarity in the ivory cage: Neoliberalism and casualisation of work in the Irish HE sector. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies13(1) 43-66.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • CudworthE. (2014). Beyond specieism: Intersectionality, critical sociology and the human domination of other animals. In N. Taylor & R. Twine (Eds.) The rise of critical animal studies: From the margins to the centre (pp. 19-35). New York, NY: Routledge.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • FisherM. (2011). The privatisation of stress. Soundings48123-133.

  • GillR. (2010). Breaking the silence: The hidden injuries of neo-liberal academia. In R. Ryan-Flood & R. Gill (Eds.) Secrecy and silence in the research process: Feminist reflections (pp. 228-244). London: Routledge.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • GillR. & DonaghueN. (2016). Resilience, apps and reluctant individualism: Technologies of self in the neoliberal academy. Women’s Studies International Forum5491-99.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • GroveJ. (2016). Fixed-term now the norm for early career academic, says UCU. The Times Higher Education. Retrieved from https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/fixed-term-now-the-norm-for-early-career-academics-says-university-and-college-union-ucu.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • HawkinsR.ManziM. & OjedaD. (2014). Lives in the making: Power, academia and the everyday. ACME: An International E-journal for Critical Geographers13(2) 328-351.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • LorenzC. (2012). If you’re so smart, why are you under surveillance? Universities, neoliberalism, and new public management Critical Inquiry38(3) 599-629.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • LorenzC. (2015January). The metrification of “quality” and the fall of the academic profession. Oxford Magazine5-11.

  • MayR.PeetzD. & StrachanG. (2013). The casual academic workforce and labour market segmentation in Australia. Labour & Industry: A Journal of the Social and Economic Relations of Work23(3) 258-275.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ReaJ. (2015). Organizing against the widening gap in academic job security in Australia. Academic Matters. Retrieved from https://academicmatters.ca/2015/06/organizing-against-the-widening-gap-in-academic-job-security-in-australia/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ReaJ. (2016). Casualisation on the increase in academia. Connect: The Magazine for Australian Casual and Sessional Academic Staff9(1) 1.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ReddenG. (2008). Publish and flourish, or perish: RAE, ERA, RQF, and other acronyms for infinite human resourcefulness. M/C Journal11(4). Retrieved from http://journal.media-culture.org.au/index.php/mcjournal/article/view/44.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ShapiroK. & DeMelloM. (2010). The state of human-animal studies. Society & Animals18(3) 307-318.

  • ShoreC. (2008). Audit culture and illiberal governance: Universities and the politics of accountability. Anthropological Theory8(3) 278-299.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SpoonerM. (2015). The deleterious personal and societal effects of the “audit culture” and a domesticated academy. International Review of Qualitative Research8(2) 212-228.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • WilkieR. (2015). Academic “dirty work”: Mapping scholarly labor in a tainted mixed-species field. Society & Animals23(3) 211-230.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
Figures
Index Card
Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 63 63 40
Full Text Views 27 27 16
PDF Downloads 19 19 9
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0