Therianthropy: Wellbeing, Schizotypy, and Autism in Individuals Who Self-Identify as Non-Human

in Society & Animals
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Abstract

Therianthropy is the belief that one is at least part non-human animal. This study aimed to address the dichotomization surrounding therianthropy in relation to mental health and wellbeing. One hundred and twelve therians and 265 non-therians completed Ryff’s Scales of Psychological Wellbeing, the O-LIFE questionnaire, and the Autism Spectrum Quotient. The results showed that therians scored lower on variables that are associated with positive social relationships. Such findings may be explained by cognitive factors and/or social factors that are associated with the stigmatization of cross-species identities. However, being a therian moderated the relationship between both autism and introverted anhedonia in relation to autonomy. Thus, a therian identity may act as a protective factor for those experiencing higher levels of autism and schizotypy.

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Figures
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    Descriptive and inferential statistics for the differences between therian and non-therian samples for autism
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    Descriptive and inferential statistics for the differences between therian and non-therian samples for Schizotypy
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    Common mental health diagnoses according to therian status in those diagnosed with mental illness
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    Coefficients, wald statistics, probability values, and confidence intervals for each predictor variable
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    Descriptive and inferential statistics for the differences between therian and non-therian samples for wellbeing
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    Impact of therianthropy and autism on levels of autonomy
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    Impact of therianthropy and introverted anhedonia on levels of autonomy
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    Interaction effect of therianthropy and autism on levels of autonomy
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    Interaction effect of therianthropy and introverted anhedonia on levels of autonomy
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