Insects as vectors of foodborne pathogenic bacteria

in Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews
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Abstract

Food safety is an important consideration worldwide. To maintain and improve our current knowledge of foodborne disease outbreaks, we must understand some of the more imminent issues related to food safety. A variety of agents are responsible for transmitting the estimated 76 million cases of illnesses caused by foodborne pathogens every year. This review explores why insects pose a serious health concern, in terms of worldwide food safety initiatives, by looking at evidence in published <abs>Food safety is an important consideration worldwide. To maintain and improve our current knowledge of foodborne disease outbreaks, we must understand some of the more imminent issues related to food safety. A variety of agents are responsible for transmitting the estimated 76 million cases of illnesses caused by foodborne pathogens every year. This review explores why insects pose a serious health concern, in terms of worldwide food safety initiatives, by looking at evidence in published literature. We highlight at least eleven different species of insects, including the lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer); secondary screwworm, Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius); synanthropic flies [flesh fly, Sarcophaga carnaria (L.); house fly, Musca domestica (L.); fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen); and stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)], American cockroach, Periplaneta americana (L.); German cockroach, Blatella germanica (L.); Oriental cockroach, Blatta orientalis (L.); Pacific beetle cockroach, Diploptera punctata (Eschscholtz); and Speckled feeder cockroach, Nauphoeta cinerea (Olivier), which act as vectors for Salmonella spp. or Escherichia coli and illustrate how these insects are successful vectors of foodborne disease outbreaks. We propose that insects be considered as one of the latest issues in food safety initiatives. Not only are some insects extremely important contributors to diseases, but now we suggest that more research into insects as potential carriers of E. coli and Salmonella spp., and therefore as contributing to foodborne disease outbreaks, is granted.

Insects as vectors of foodborne pathogenic bacteria

in Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews

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