National Moth Week - a new global citizen science project focused on moths

in Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews
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National Moth Week is a global citizen science project focusing on moths. During the first National Moth Week, which took place in July 2012, people in over 300 locations worldwide observed and documented the presence of moths in various habitats. This article describes the project’s goals and the methods used to achieve those goals. A summary of outreach activities and data collection is presented.

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References
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Figures
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    (A) The first NMW logo featuring an image of a male Io moth, Automeris io (Fabricius, 1775) (Saturniidae) superimposed on a map of the USA with an image of the night sky as the background. (B) The logo for future NMW using the same image of an Io moth with a globe in the background. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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    Number of registered National Moth Week event locations. United States bars are not to scale with number of events noted on the bars.National Moth Week locations were from inner cities such as downtown Manhattan (New York City, New York), to remote places in Costa Rica, Kenya, Gambia and elsewhere. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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    National Moth Week moth nights. (A) Athol, MA, USA; photo credit: Dave Small. (B) Elk Pine Woods, East Brunswick, NJ, USA; photo credit: Friends EBEC. (C) Broad Meadow Brook, Worcester, MA, USA; photo credit: Dave Small. (D) NJ Meadowlands Commission, Lyndhurst, NJ, USA; photo credit: Friends EBEC. (E) Frost Woods Park, East Brunswick, NJ, USA; photo credit: Leah Frederick. (F) Frost Woods Park, East Brunswick, NJ, USA; photo credit: Leah Frederick. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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    National Moth Week moth night 27-28 July, 2012 in the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest near Fairbanks, Alaska (A, B). Moths collected at these locations by Kenelm Philip (C), and by Jim Kruse (D). Photo credits: Kenelm Philip and Jim Kruse. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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    (A) A moth shaped potato, steak and corn dish prepared by a family in Massachusetts, USA for their first National Moth Week event; photo credit: Alan Moskowitz. (B) A street artist in Ottawa, Canada, painting a Luna Moth in celebration of National Moth Week; see more at http://nationalmothweek.org/?s=ottawa; photo credit: Jim des Rivieres, www.moths.ca. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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    Moth “spottings” submitted to the Project Noah Moth Mission (A-C) and the Project Noah Moth Week Digital Patch (D). (A) Leopard Moth (Pantherodes pardalis) from Pereira, Quindío, Colombia, spotted on July 24, 2012 by Carolina Holguin. (B) Ghost Moth (Trichophassus giganteus) from Morretes, Parana, Brazil, July 24, 2012, spotted by Sergio Monteiro. (C) Lesser Pink-and-Green Hawk Moth (Callambulyx sp.) from Thimphu, Bhutan, spotted on July 23, 2012 by Irungbam Jatishwor Singh. (D) Project Noah Moth Week digital patch. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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    Certificate of participation in the National Moth Week. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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    Letter from Congressman Rush Holt on creating a mothing community.

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    Image of the interactive Google map showing NMW event locations. Green markers are public events. Blue markers are private events. Information on each event is visible by clicking on a marker. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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    Number of visitors to www.nationalmothweek.org during 2012 showing the spike corresponding to the event.

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    Number of ‘Likes’ on the main NMW Facebook page, and number of Facebook members who shared stories from the NMW page. This figure is published in color in the online version.

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