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Exploring mitigating factors for aflatoxin awareness and incidence among smallholder groundnut farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa

In: World Mycotoxin Journal
Authors:
J. Jelliffe USDA Economic Research Service, 805 Pennsylvania Ave, Kansas City, MO 64105, USA

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5881-4774
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B. Bravo-Ureta University of Connecticut, Agricultural and Resource Economics, Storrs, CT, USA

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https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9575-3053
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D. Jordan North Carolina State University at Raleigh, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Raleigh, NC, USA

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https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4786-2727
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A. Dankyi Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Crops Research Institute, Accra, Ghana

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W. Appaw Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, College of Science, Kumasi, Ghana

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4154-3672
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M. Mochiah Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Crops Research Institute, Accra, Ghana

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https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4347-4268
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Abstract

This study considers the association between agricultural extension, aflatoxin, and good management practices among smallholder groundnut farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. The first part examines extension and self-reported knowledge and perceptions of aflatoxin for three countries. This is done using pooled survey data (n = 1388) collected from 2014 to 2016, beginning with Uganda (n = 480) in 2014, Ghana (n = 537) in 2015, and Mozambique (n = 335) in 2016. Results from probit regressions suggest that aflatoxin knowledge and perceptions are related to village extension services, household head education, farm size, groundnut production area, and experience with aflatoxins. To build upon these findings, additional information on aflatoxin levels and good management practices for a sub-sample of the 2015 Ghana survey (n = 134) is analysed. Negative binomial regression estimates indicate significantly lower aflatoxin levels for households that (1) follow good management practices and (2) are in receipt of village extension services, with the lowest average aflatoxin level from the combination of (1) and (2). These findings underscore the role of extension in combating the incidence of aflatoxin in groundnut value chains. In this way, extension is associated with greater knowledge and perceptions, as well as lower levels of aflatoxin, that can be further reduced with good management practices.

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