China's Three Teachings and the Relationship of Heaven, Earth and Humanity

in Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology
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This paper examines how China's major religious philosophical traditions have historically attempted to balance and integrate the forces of heaven, earth, and humanity. Special attention is given to the central role of mountains within these traditions. It argues that the complementary relationship among China's three teachings provides a culturally relevant and viable space in which an emerging sense of environmental consciousness and social justice may flourish in China.

China's Three Teachings and the Relationship of Heaven, Earth and Humanity

in Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

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