The Greenland Self-Government Act: The Pitfall for the Inuit in Greenland to Remain an Indigenous People?

in The Yearbook of Polar Law Online
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Are the Inuit in Greenland an indigenous people under international law? And what are the consequences of that categorization? This article focuses on the right to self-determination as the Inuit are recognized as an indigenous people; however, the Greenlanders have the explicit right to independence. The article concludes that the Self-Government Act can be regarded as the pitfall for the Inuit as an indigenous people. So far, nobody has fallen in; however, independence may mean an end to the status as an indigenous people. While the law might be considered relatively clear on this, the self-identification as an indigenous people will most likely not stop overnight.

The Greenland Self-Government Act: The Pitfall for the Inuit in Greenland to Remain an Indigenous People?

in The Yearbook of Polar Law Online

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