Competing Jurisdictions

Settling land claims in Africa

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This book is about the politicking and strife over land between various stakeholders on the African continent, including Madagascar. It is about attempts to control land tenure ‘from above’ and about local manoeuvring ‘from below’. The contributing authors analyse the intricate relations between the central government, the local government and grassroots level institutions.

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Sandra J.T.M. Evers, Ph.D. in Anthropology, University of Amsterdam (2001), is Assistant Professor at the Dept. of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. She specialises in South West Indian Ocean studies, with a particular focus on Madagascar and the Seychelles. Her earlier publications include People without history: the tombless in the Extreme Southern Highlands of Madagascar. Lova/Inheritance: Past and Present in Madagascar. Michigan Discussions in Anthropology, vol. 14, pp. 37-52 (University of Michigan, 2003) and Constructing history, culture and inequality. The Betsileo in the extreme southern highlands of Madagascar (Brill, 2002). Marja J. Spierenburg, Ph.D. in Anthropology, University of Amsterdam (2003), is Assistant Professor at the Dept. Culture, Organisation and Management, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Earlier publications on natural resource management and spirit possession include The quest for fruition through Ngoma (co-edited with R. van Dijk and R. Reis. James Currey, 2000) and Strangers, spirits, and land reforms. Conflicts about land in Dande, northern Zimbabwe (Brill 2004). Harry Wels, Ph.D. (2000) in Organisational Anthropology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, is Associate Professor at the Dept. Culture, Organisation and Management, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He has published broadly on issues of organisational co-operation in southern Africa, including ‘Formidable fences. Organisational co-operation and boundary bullies in Zimbabwe’, in: Paulsen, N. and Hernes, T. (eds.), Managing Boundaries in organisations. Multiple perspectives, (New York: Palgrave, 2003) and Private wildlife conservation in Zimbabwe. Joint ventures and reciprocity (Brill, 2003).