Regeneration and Hegemony

Franco-Batavian Relations in the Revolutionary Era, 1795-1803

Series:

What is the relevance of law to a world dominated by a hegemon? What is the relation between power and law at the international level? In this volume, these questions are approached based on a case study of relations between France and the Netherlands throughout the Revolutionary Wars. It shows that power and law are not isolated phenomena and that their relation is not as one-dimensional as it is commonly portrayed. Law can be an instrument of power, while law poses a normative force even a superpower cannot ignore. Thereto, the case study sketches a context in which an international law based on sovereign equality could, to a large extent, be circumvented by exploiting crossborder factionalism, thus nuancing state-centric perspectives on international politics.

Studies in the History of International Law, vol. 1

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Biographical Note

Raymond Kubben (1980) studied law and public administration sciences. He obtained his Ph.D. in Law at Tilburg University in 2009 and is presently Assistant Professor in the history and theory of international law and international relations at that university.

Table of contents

Introductory note, by Randall Lesaffer
Preface
Map of the Republic of the United Provinces on the eve of the Revolutionary era

Part I. Révolution sans frontières

Introduction
1. Power and law in international order
2. The French Revolution and the European order

Part II. Icy rivers, chains of gold: the Franco-Batavian alliance

1. Gallicus amicus
2. Clapping hands, fraternal style
3. A constitutive treaty?
4. War and peace
5. The limits of independence
6. The alliance renewed

Part III. The Batavian Republic and the struggle for peace

1. Revolutionary peace
2. Peace at last
3. Negotiating with Britain
4. A gathering in Rastatt
5. The Consul’s peace
6. Bridging the Channel

Part IV. The Revolutionary alliance

Appendix

Abbreviations
Translation of words in Dutch
Archivalia
Bibliography
Index

Readership

All those interested in legal history, the history of international law in particular, diplomatic history, the history of the French Revolution and the Revolutionary Wars, as well as (early)modern Dutch History.

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