The Destiny of Modern Societies

The Calvinist Predestination of a New Society

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This book is a sociological analysis of the relationship between modern society, in particular America, and Calvinism in the Weberian tradition. While the book continues this tradition, it further expands, elaborates on, and goes beyond earlier sociological analyses. The book examines the impact of Calvinism on modern society as a whole, thus extending, elaborating on, and going beyond the previous analyses of the influence of the Calvinist religion only on the capitalist economy. It analyzes how Calvinism has determined most contemporary social institutions, including political, civic, cultural, and economic, in its respective societies, particularly, through its derivative Puritanism, America. For that purpose, the book applies the idea of the destiny of societies or nations to American society in particular. It argues, demonstrates, and illustrates the Calvinist societal "predestination", through the Puritan determination, of American society .
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Biographical Note

Milan Zafirovski, Ph.D. (1990) in Economics, University of Saint Cyril and Methodius, Macedonia, Ph.D. (1999) in Sociology, Florida International University, is Associate Professor of Sociology at University of North Texas. He has published several books, including Liberal Modernity and its Adversaries (Brill, 2007), and The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Authoritarianism (Springer, 2007).

Table of contents

Introduction

1. AMERICA’S DESTINY AND CALVINISM
The “First New Nation” and European Calvinism
Calvinism—The Genesis and the “Destiny” of America?
Calvinist “Predestination” via the Puritan “Destiny” of America
The Nature and Scope of the Calvinist “Predestination” of the “New Nation”
Appendix: America’s “Destiny” and Tocqueville, Weber, and Marx

2. AMERICA’S CALVINIST DESTINY IDENTIFIED AND SPECIFIED
What Is America’s Calvinist “Destiny”?
Bibliocracy from the Genesis to the Destiny
The Calvinist Design and System of Theocracy Reconsidered
From Calvinist Theocracy to the Moralistic “Tyranny of Puritanism” to “Moral Fascism”
Calvinist Theocracy as Total Society
Calvinist Theocracy as a Total Social System: Theocratic Subsystems

3. ECONOMIC SYSTEM OF CALVINIST THEOCRACY
A Theocratic Master-Servant Economy
Elements and Subtypes of the Calvinist Pure Master-Servant Economy
The Calvinist Slave Economy
Calvinist Feudal Servitude
Elements of the Calvinist Diluted Master-Servant Economy
Calvinist Predatory Capitalism
“Free Enterprise” Epilogue: Anti-Labor, Pro-Capital Economy—America’s Calvinist Economic “Destiny”
4. POLITICAL SYSTEM OF CALVINIST THEOCRACY
Theocratic Polity
Theocratic Polity: Formal Terms
Theocratic Polity: Substantive Terms
Theocratic cum Anti-Liberal Polity
Theocratic Polity as a Non-Democratic Government
Theocratic Aristocracy
Theocratic Oligarchy
Theocratic Plutocracy

5. CIVIL SOCIETY OF CALVINIST THEOCRACY
Puritan Moralistic Tyranny
Rediscovering and Redefining Moral Fascism
Syndromes of Puritan Moral Fascism
The Legal-Institutional Mechanism of Puritan Moral Fascism
From a Free Private Sphere to a Coercive Monastic Order
Global Moral Fascism—Pan-American “Manifest Destiny”?

6. CULTURAL SYSTEM OF CALVINIST THEOCRACY
Theocratic Culture
The Puritan “Culture of Death”?
The Adverse Fate of Aesthetic Culture in Calvinist Theocracy
The Adverse Fate of Intellectual Culture in Calvinist Theocracy

7. CALVINISM RECONSIDERED
Reconsidering Calvinism
Calvinism’s Genesis Revisited
The Dual Story of Calvinism: From an Abysmal Failure in the Old World to a Fateful Triumph in the New Nation The Spirit and Heritage of Calvinism Reconsidered
Appendix: “Differences” between Calvinism and Puritanism Revisited

8. CONCLUSIONS
“Destinies” of Human Societies
The “Wealth and Destiny of Nations”
The Calvinist-Capitalist Elective Affinity in the “New Nation”: Theocratic Capitalism?
The Supreme Historical Irony? The Calvinist “French Connection” to America

References
Index

Readership

All those interested in comparative and historical sociology, social theory, economics, political science, history and other social sciences, critical academics, some non-academic groups.

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