The Panama Canal

Series:

The relationship between straits and interoceanic canals has always been ambiguous. Unlike straits, interoceanic canals are neither natural nor subject to a universal legal regime like the Law of the Sea. However, straits and interoceanic canals share comparable historical experiences due to their geographic similarities.

Suspending interest in a purely legal analysis, The Panama Canal lets logic yield to experience and considers the Panama Canal as an “artificial strait.” The volume recasts the dynamic events that have changed the Panama Canal in the context of three interactive elements: environments, flows, and territoriality. Cleverly deciphering from history how changes in one element led to changes in another, The Panama Canal suggests a considerably new perspective for viewing the canal’s past and future.

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EUR €190.00USD $236.00

Biographical Note

Robert W. Aguirre, Ph.D. (1999) in Geography, Louisiana State University, is a professional geographer and independent scholar in Seattle, WA. He has done extensive research on the Panama Canal in Panama and Washington DC and publishes on geographic analysis methods.

Table of contents

Contents

Chapter 1: The Environment of a Strait
Chapter 2: The Environment of the Isthmus of Panama
Chapter 3: Interoceanic Flows in Transit through Panama’s Human-Built Environment
Chapter 4: Panamanian Territory over Flows through the Environment
Chapter 5: American Territoriality in Geographic Perspective
Chapter 6: The Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government over Inland Transportation from the 1780s to the 1880s
Chapter 7: Interoceanic Transportation and the Two Panamas Under the ‘1st democracy’ (1830s-1870s)
Chapter 8: Interoceanic Transportation and the Two Panamas Under the ‘2nd republic’ (1870s-1930s) Before Panamanian Independence
Chapter 9: The Extraterritorial Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government over the Maritime Environment after the 1880s
Chapter 10: The Panama Canal and the Two Panamas Under the ‘2nd republic’ (1870s-1930s) After Panamanian Independence
Chapter 11: The Panama Canal and the Two Panamas Under the ‘2nd democracy’ (1930s-1970s)
Chapter 12: The Panama Canal and the Two Panamas Under the ‘3rd republic’ (1980-?)
Chapter 13: The Future of the Panama Canal as an Artificial Strait
APPENDIX
NOTES

Readership

Scholars and specialists in geography, law, history, political science, and the social sciences; the public interested in the history of the Panama Canal; decision makers interested in the canal’s future.

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