'You Shall Surely not Die': The Concepts of Sin and Death as Expressed in the Manuscript Art of Northwestern Europe, c.800-1200 (2 Vols.) 

Series:

The period 800-1200 saw many changes in attitude towards death, sin and salvation. Visual sources can provide a valuable complement to written sources, often modifying or adding another dimension to what scholars and theologians expressed in words. Taking miniatures showing the Fall of Man and those with personifications of death, this study looks at the ideas they express and the relationship between them. It examines both the general tendencies and specific manuscripts, relating them to their contexts and to the writings of the time. This book shows the shifts in ideas as to what constitutes sin, the merging of eschatological death with sin and a new emphasis on physical death, thereby giving new insights into medieval thought and culture.
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Biographical Note

Jill Bradley, Ph.D (2008), is affiliated to the Centre for Ph.D Research at the Radboud University, Nijmegen. Among her publications are contributions to the selected papers of Passages from Antiquity to the Middle Ages, 2005 and 2007.

Review Quotes

"Bradley’s book is highly original". Katja Ritari, University of Helsinki. In: Mirator 10:1/2009, p. 96-98.

"Bradley‘s extremely thorough investigation prioritises the important symbiosis between text, image and society and, in so doing, yields a wealth of fresh insight into medieval attitudes toward sin and death". Natalie Jones, University of Leicester. In: Peer English, Issue 4, p. 130-133.

Table of contents

Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
Abbreviations

Introduction

I. The Ninth Century: Loyalty and Lordship in the Frankish Realm
1. The General Context
2. The Basic Type of the Fall in the Ninth Century – the Vivian Bible
3. The Attitude to Death in the Ninth Century
4. Sin and Death in the Ninth Century

II. Monastic Reform and Man’s Fatal Flaw
1. The General Context of the Fall c.1000
2. The Basic Type of the Fall
3. Specific Manuscripts
4. The Attitude to Sin c.1000
5. Death in the Late Tenth and Early Eleventh Centuries
6. Sin and Death c.1000

III. Knowing the Enemy, the Battle Within
1. General Context
2. The Basic Type of the Fall
3. Specific Manuscripts
4. The Attitude to Sin in the Late Eleventh and Early Twelfth centuries
5. Death in the Late Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries
6. Sin and Death in the Late Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries

IV. Responsibility, Redemption and the Demise of Death
1. General Context
2. The Basic Type of the Fall in the Second Half of the Twelfth Century
3. Specific Manuscripts
4. The Concept of Sin in the Second Half of the Twelfth Century
5. Death at the End of the Twelfth Century
6. Sin and Death in the Late Twelfth Century

V. The Fall in Public Places
1. Triple Accessibility
2. The Basic Types for a Broad Public, a Restricted Public and the ‘Indiscernible‘ Works
3. Individual Works and Sites
4. ‘Public’ Works and Miniatures of the Fall

VI. Conclusions
1. Miniatures as Statement and Propaganda
2. The Context Dependency of the Concepts of Sin and Death
3. The Role of Physical Death in Salvation
4. The Female as Sin and Death

Illustrations

Appendices
Bibliography
Index

Readership

Those interested in the history of ideas, gender, religion and society in the late and high Middle Ages as well as medieval art historians and iconographers.

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