Elliot R. Wolfson: Poetic Thinking

Series: 

Elliot R. Wolfson is Professor of Religious Studies and the Marsha and Jay Glazer Chair of Jewish Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A scholar of Jewish mysticism and philosophy, he uses the textual sources of Judaism to examine universal philosophical topics such as the function and processes of the imagination, the paradoxes of temporality, and the mystery of poetic language. Working at the intersection of disciplines and refusing to reduce texts to their simple historical contexts, Wolfson puts texts spanning diverse temporal, cultural, and religious periods in creative counterpoint. His sensitivity to language reveals its fragility as it simultaneously points to the uncertainty of meaning. The result is a creative reading of both Judaism and philosophy that informs and is informed by poetic sensibility and philosophical hermeneutics.

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Hava Tirosh-Samuelson is Professor of History, Irving and Miriam Lowe Professor of Modern Judaism, and Director of the Center for Jewish Studies at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona.

Aaron W. Hughes holds the Philip S. Bernstein Chair of Jewish Studies in the Department of Religion and Classics at the University of Rochester.
The Contributors
Editors’ Introduction to Series
Elliot R. Wolfson: An Intellectual Portrait Aaron W. Hughes
Occultation of the Feminine and the Body of Secrecy in Medieval Kabbalah Elliot R. Wolfson
Iconicity of the Text: Reification of Torah and the Idolatrous Impulse of Zoharic Kabbalah Elliot R. Wolfson
Iconic Visualization and the Imaginal Body of God: The Role of Intention in the Rabbinic Conception of Prayer Elliot R. Wolfson
Not Yet Now: Speaking of the End and the End of Speaking Elliot R. Wolfson
Interview with Professor Elliot Wolfson Hava Tirosh-Samuelson and Aaron W. Hughes
Select Bibliography
Available in print and electronically, the books in the Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers will be ideal for use in diverse educational settings (e.g., college-level courses, rabbinic seminaries, adult Jewish learning, and inter-religious dialogue).