Prosecuting the Destruction of Cultural Property in International Criminal Law

With a Case Study on the Khmer Rouge’s Destruction of Cambodia’s Heritage

Series:

In Prosecuting the Destruction of Cultural Property in International Criminal Law Caroline Ehlert offers an analysis of treaty law protecting cultural property from destruction and foremost of the relevant provisions for prosecuting the destruction of cultural property in international criminal law.
The wanton destruction of valuable cultural property during armed conflict as well as during peacetime is omnipresent. Therefore it is of the utmost importance to provide for provisions criminalising the destruction of cultural property and offering a basis for the prosecution of possible perpetrators.
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Biographical Note

Caroline Ehlert, Dr. iur. (2013), University of Zurich, is currently working at a law firm in Zurich, which specializes in criminal law. She has published some articles on international criminal law and the proceedings at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal in Cambodia.

Table of contents

Excerpt of table of contents:
Abbreviations; Bibliography; Introduction;
Preliminary Remarks;
§ 1. Concept of International Criminal Law; § 2. Sources of International Criminal Law;
Part I: Prohibition of the Destruction of Cultural Property in International Treaty Law
§ 1. Historical Development; § 2. The 1899 and 1907 Hague Conventions; § 3. The Genocide Convention; § 4.The Geneva Conventions; § 5. The 1954 Hague Convention; § 6. The 1972 Convention for the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage; § 7. The 1977 Additional Protocols to the Geneva Conventions of 1949; § 8. The 1999 Second Hague Protocol; § 9. The 2003 UNESCO Declaration concerning the Intentional Destruction of Cultural Heritage; § 10. Interim Conclusion;
Part II: The Prosecution of the Destruction of Cultural Property in the Practice of the International Criminal Tribunals;
§ 1. Structures of Crimes under International Criminal Law; § 2. War Crimes; § 3.Crimes against Humanity; § 4.Interim Conclusion;
Part III: Case Study Cambodia;
§ 1. Background to the Khmer Rouge Regime; § 2. The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC); § 3. Direct Applicability of the 1954 Hague Convention by the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia; § 4. Alternative Provisions for the Prosecution of the Destruction of Cultural Property at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia; § 5. Interim Conclusion;
Conclusion;
§ 1. Prosecuting the Destruction of Cultural Property during Armed Conflicts; § 2. Prosecuting the Destruction of Cultural Property during Peacetime;

Readership

All interested in the international law concerning the protection of cultural property as well as in the international criminal law prosecuting its destruction.

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