The skillful use of the Scots language has long been a distinguishing feature of the literatures of Scotland. The essays in this volume make a major contribution to our understanding of the Scots language, past and present, and its written dissemination in poetry, fiction and drama, and in non-literary texts, such as personal letters. They cover aspects of the development of a national literature in the Scots language, and they also give due weight to its international dimension by focusing on translations into Scots from languages as diverse as Greek, Latin and Chinese, and by considering the spread of written Scots to Northern Ireland, the United States of America and Australia. Many of the essays respond to and extend the scholarship of J. Derrick McClure, whose considerable impact on Scottish literary and linguistic studies is surveyed and assessed in this volume.
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Review Quotes

”The present collection provides a 360-degree overview of the variegated and multidisciplinary nature of the language that has been Derrick McClure’s lifetime passion; in this sense it is an undeniable success which the honorand may find to his taste, and constitutes a most suitable tribute to his brilliant and rich career.” - Edoardo McKenna, University of Aberdeen, in: ASLA - Association for Scottish Literary Studies 2014, pp. 161-171

“Ay, weill; as ye wul hae jaloused, this is a richt challenging and rewairdin wark, containin muntains o leir an a warld o deep insicht; weill warth the layin doun o 65 euros!”
– Kenneth D. Farrow, in Lallans 84 (2014), pp. 121-128

Table of contents

John M. Kirk and Iseabail Macleod: J. Derrick McClure: An Appreciation
J. Derrick McClure: List of Publications
Acknowledgements
Contributors
John M. Kirk and Iseabail Macleod: Introduction
Jeremy Smith: Textual Afterlives: Barbour’s Bruce and Hary’s Wallace
Robert McColl Millar: To bring my language near to the language of men? Dialect and Dialect Use in the Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries: Some Observations
Marina Dossena: Stour or Dour or Clour: An Overview of Scots Usage in Stevenson’s Works and Correspondence
James Robertson: Pittin the Word(s) Oot: The Itchy Coo Experience of Publishing in Scots in the Twenty-first Century
Christine Robinson: Loanwords in Scots: Some Reflections from Lexicography
Gavin Falconer: G.F. Savage-Armstrong’s Ballads of Down
Stephen Dornan: Scots in Two Early Ulster Novels
Michael B. Montgomery: The Linguistic Landscape of Eighteenth-Century South Argyll, as Revealed by Highland Scot Emigrants to North Carolina
Graham Tulloch: Styles of Scots in Australian Literary Texts
Caroline Macafee: How Gavin Douglas Handled Some Well-known Passages of Virgil’s Aeneid
Peih-ying Lu and John Corbett: Doric Orientalism: James Legge’s Translation of the Shi Jin, or Book of Poetry
Ian Brown: Motivation and Politico-cultural Context in the Creation of Scots Language Versions of Greek Tragedies
John M. Kirk: Civil Service Scots: Prose or Poetry?
Index

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