Editors: Tom Hubbard and R.D.S. Jack
If there is ocht in Scotland that’s worth ha’en / There is nae distance to which it’s unattached – Hugh MacDiarmid A realignment of Scottish literary studies is long overdue. The present volume counters the relative neglect of comparative literature in Scotland by exploring the fortunes of Scottish writing in mainland Europe, and, conversely, the engagement of Scottish literary intellectuals with European texts. Most of the contributions draw on the online Bibliography of Scottish Literature in Translation. Together they demonstrate the richness of the creative dialogue, not only between writers, but also between musicians and visual artists when they turn their attention to literature. The contributors to this volume cover most of Europe, including the German-speaking countries, Scandinavia, France, Catalonia, Portugal, Italy, the Balkans, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Russia. All Scotland's major literary languages – Gaelic, Scots, English and Latin – are featured in a continent-wide labyrinth that will repay further exploration.

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Biographical Note

Tom Hubbard was recently Visiting Professor in Scottish Literature and Culture at the Universities of Budapest and Pécs, and is an Honorary Fellow of the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh.
R.D.S. Jack is Emeritus Professor of Medieval and Scottish Literature and Honorary Fellow, University of Edinburgh.

Table of contents

Contributors Ian RANKIN: Foreword Tom HUBBARD: Introduction: Coalescences Roger GREEN: George Buchanan’s Psalm Paraphrases in a European Context R.D.S. JACK: Translation and Early Scottish Literature Norbert WASZEK: The Scottish Enlightenment in Germany, and its Translator, Christian Garve (1742–98) Christopher WHYTE: Reasons for Crossing: European Poetry in Gaelic J. Derrick MCCLURE: European Poetry in Scots Margaret ELPHINSTONE: Some Fictions of Scandinavian Scotland Kirsteen MCCUE: Schottische Lieder ohne Wörter?: What Happened to the Words for the Scots Song Arrangements by Beethoven and Weber? Iain GALBRAITH: “Your Scottish dialect drives us mad”: A Note on the Reception of Poetry in Translation, with an Account of the Translation of Recent Scottish Poetry into German Corinna KRAUSE: Gaelic Poetry in Germany Dominique DELMAIRE: Translating Robert Burns into French: Verse or Prose? Eilidh BATEMAN and Sergi MAINER: Scotland and Catalonia Zsuzsanna VARGA: Sporadic Encounters: Scottish-Portuguese Literary Contacts Since 1500 Marco FAZZINI: Bridging Ineffable Gaps: MacDiarmid’s First Scots Poem into Italian Mario RELICH: Scottish Writers and Yugoslavia as Apocalyptic Metaphor Emilia SZAFFNER: Scottish Writers in Translation as Published in the Hungarian Magazine Nagyvilág Teresa Grace MURRAY: Small Voices in the Big Picture Robert R. CALDER: Slavist as Poet: J.F. Hendry and the Epic of Russia (Some Footnotes from a Personal Memoir) Index

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