Menachem Fisch: The Rationality of Religious Dispute

Series:

Menachem Fisch is the Joseph and Ceil Mazer Professor of History and Philosophy of Science, Director of the Center for Religious and Interreligious Studies, and former Chair of the Graduate School of Philosophy at Tel Aviv University. He is also the Senior Fellow of the Kogod Center for the Renewal of Jewish Thought at the Shalom Hartman Institute, Jerusalem. Trained in physics, philosophy, and the history and philosophy of science, Fisch has confronted epistemological questions and applied his answers to Jewish philosophy, integrating it into the larger discourse of rationality, normativity, religion, politics, and science. His work brings a creative combination of historical, philosophical, and critical insights to an analysis of Talmudic texts, thereby establishing a new and original understanding of rabbinic legal reasoning and religious commitment.

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Biographical Note

Hava Tirosh-Samuelson is Professor of History, Irving and Miriam Lowe Professor of Modern Judaism, and Director of the Center for Jewish Studies at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona.

Aaron W. Hughes holds the Philip S. Bernstein Chair of Jewish Studies in the Department of Religion and Classics at the University of Rochester.

Table of contents

The Contributors
Editors' Introduction to the Series
Menachem Fisch: An Intellectual Portrait, Noah J. Efron
Rational Rabbis: Its Project and Argument, Menachem Fisch
A Modest Proposal: Toward a Religious Politics of Epistemic Humility, Menachem Fisch
Judaism and the Religion Crisis of Modern Science, Menachem Fisch
Science, Religion, and Rationality: A Neo-Hegelian Approach, Menachem Fisch
Judaism and the Religious Value of Diversity and Dialogue: Drafting a Jewish Response to Nostra Aetate, Menachem Fisch
Interview with Menachem Fisch, Hava Tirosh-Samuelson
Select Bibliography

Readership

Available in print and electronically, the books in the Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers will be ideal for use in diverse educational settings (e.g., college-level courses, rabbinic seminaries, adult Jewish learning, and inter-religious dialogue).