Small Satellites

Regulatory Challenges and Chances

Series:

Editor: Irmgard Marboe
Small Satellites – Regulatory Challenges and Chances edited by Irmgard Marboe addresses the booming phenomenon of small satellites. The rapid innovation of technology has made it possible to develop, launch and operate small satellites at rather low costs. Universities, start-ups and also governments see the chance to access outer space more easily and inexpensively. Yet, the importance to comply with existing rules and regulations that are in place to ensure that outer space is used and explored in a safe and responsible manner is sometimes overlooked. The book addresses this challenge and shows how it can be met. The contributors are renowned academics and practicioners from many different countries that share their experiences and insights and suggest practical solutions.
Restricted Access

E-Book:

EUR €133.00USD $190.00

Biographical Note

Irmgard Marboe is professor of international law at the University of Vienna. She received her doctorate in 1994 and her habilitation in 2007 at that university. She is an internationally renowned expert in space law and in international investment law.

Review Quote

"I would hope that those discussing matters in all the arenas in which the necessary law may be created, and not only in COPUOS, will use these chapters to inform themselves, before they harden their views."
-Prof. Francis Lyall, German Journal of Air and Space Law

Table of contents

Table of Contents
Prefaces;
The practical perspective
Micro/Nano/Picosatellite – Activities: Challenges towards New Space Education and Utilisation Otto Koudelka, Technical University of Graz, Austria;
Capacity Building in Space Technology Development: The Role of the United Nations Werner Balogh, UNOOSA;
Small Satellites: Innovative Activities, Traditional Laws and the Industry Perspective Neta Palkovitz, ISIS, The Netherlands;
Small Satellite Industry and Legal Perspectives in the United States Michael Dornik, EchoStar Corp., United States, Milton Smith, Sherman & Howard, United States;
Launching Numerous Small Satellites – A Flourishing Business? The Case of the Russian Federation Olga A. Volynskaya, Foreign Trade Academy, Russian Federation, Rustam A. Kasyanov, State Institute of International Relations, Russian Federation;
Small Satellites as a Chance for Developing Countries Romina Acevedo, Bolivarian Space Agency, Venezuel, Roberto Becerra, Bolivarian Space Agency, Venezuela;
The legal perspective
Authorisation of Small Satellites under National Space Legislation; Sa’id Mosteshar, Space Institute, London, United Kingdom, Irmgard Marboe, University of Vienna, NPOC Space Law, Austria;
Liability for Damage Caused by Small Satellites – A Non-issue? Frans G. von der Dunk, University of Nebraska, United States;
Registration of Small Satellites and the Case of the Netherlands Tanja Masson-Zwaan, International Institute of Space Law, The Netherlands;
QB 50: Legal Aspects of a Multinational Small Satellite Initiative Jean-François Mayence, Belgian Science Policy Office, Belgium;
Small Satellites and Space Debris Mitigation Cordula Steinkogler, University of Vienna, NPOC Space Law, Austria;
The ITU Radio Regulations Related to Small Satellites Attila Matas, ITU, Yvon Henri, ITU, Chuen Chern Loo, ITU;
Satellite Registration Management for Educational Small Satellite Programmes Piero Galeone, ESA, Daniel Sagath, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Joost Vanreusel, ESA;
The Impact of Technology and Export Controls on Small Satellite Missions Maximilian Trautinger, University of Vienna, Austria ;
Launch Contracts for Small Satellites – The Essential Elements Hiroyuki Kishindo, JAXA, Japan;
Ensuring Regulatory Compliance for Small Satellites through Procurement and Grant Conditions Ingo Baumann, BHO Legal, Germany;
The economic perspective
Crowdfunding for Small Satellites Peter Platzer, Spire, United States, Katharina Klausner, Austria;
Do Small Satellites Need Insurance? Cécile Gaubert, Marsh, France;
Index

Readership

The book is of particular interest for universities, start-up companies, space agencies and governments involved in small satellite projects. It is directed to students, professors, researchers, project managers, employees of space agencies and governments, parliamentarians and politicians.

Information

Collection Information