Giannozzo Manetti's New Testament

Translation Theory and Practice in Fifteenth-Century Italy

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In Giannozzo Manetti’s New Testament Annet den Haan analyses the Latin translation of the Greek New Testament made by the fifteenth-century humanist Giannozzo Manetti (1396-1459). The book includes the first edition of Manetti’s text.

Manetti’s translation was the first since Jerome’s Vulgate, and it predates Erasmus’ Novum Instrumentum by half a century. Written at the Vatican court in the 1450s, it is a unique example of humanist philology applied to the sacred text in the pre-Reformation era. Den Haan argues that Manetti’s translation was influenced by Valla’s Annotationes, and compares Manetti’s translation method with his treatise on correct translation, Apologeticus (1458).

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Front Matter
Pages: i–x
Introduction
Pages: 1–6
Writing Process
Pages: 26–63
Textual Criticism
Pages: 64–84
Apologeticus
Pages: 110–152
Translation Method
Pages: 153–190
Conclusions
Pages: 191–192
Note on the Text
Pages: 195–198
Manetti’s Library
Pages: 521–524
Bibliography
Pages: 525–535
Indexes
Pages: 536–547
Annet den Haan, Ph.D. (2015), Aarhus University (Denmark), is postdoctoral researcher at that university. She has published several articles on Manetti, including “Giannozzo Manetti’s New Testament: New Evidence on Sources, Translation Process and the Use of Valla’s Annotationes” in Renaissance Studies.
Introduction
1. Manetti’s life and works
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Florence
1.3 Rome and Naples (1454-1459)
1.4 Manetti, Bessarion and Valla
1.5 Conclusions
2. Writing process
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Manetti’s library
2.3 Sources (vorlage)
2.3.1 The Latin Text
2.3.2 The Greek Text
2.3.3 Manetti’s request for Biblical manuscripts
2.4 Revising the vulgate
2.5 Manetti’s working copy: Pal.lat.45
2.6 Manetti’s redactions of Pal.lat.45
2.6.1 Consistent replacements
2.6.2 Stylistic changes
2.7 Valla’s Annotations
2.7.1 Proving Valla’s influence
2.7.2 The relevance of Valla’s influence
2.8 The New Testament and Adversus iudaeos et gentes
2.9 A later copy: Urb.lat.6
2.9.1 The Urbinate manuscripts
2.9.2 The text of Urb.lat.6
2.10 Conclusions
3. Textual criticism
3.1 Introduction
3.2 The Greek tradition
3.3 Latin readings and writing errors
3.4 Jerome, Bessarion and Valla
3.4.1 Jerome
3.4.2 Bessarion
3.4.3 Valla
3.4.4 A ‘conservative’ reading: 1 Corinthians 15: 10
3.5 Conclusions
4. Translation theory from Antiquity to the Renaissance
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Classical Antiquity
4.3 Jerome
4.4 Middle Ages
4.5 The first humanists
4.6 Leonardo Bruni
4.6.1 Bruni’s Prefaces
4.6.2 Bruni’s De interpretatione recta
4.7 Conclusions
5. Apologeticus
5.1 Introduction
5.2 The inspiration of the Septuagint
5.2.1 The Septuagint: early accounts
5.2.2 Jerome
5.2.3 Augustine
5.2.4 Manetti’s view
5.3 Apologeticus v
5.3.1 Part One: definition and requirements
5.3.2 Part Two: strategies and genres
5.3.3 Manetti’s theory and the method of the Seventy-Two
5.4 Legitimizing new translations: Manetti and Valla
5.4.1 Valla’s philological programme
5.4.2 Valla and Jerome
5.4.3 Poggio’s criticism
5.4.4 Manetti
5.5 Conclusions
6. Translation method
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Quantitative representation
6.3 Segmentation
6.4 Word order
6.5 Consistency
6.5.1 Consistency and writing process
6.5.2 Case study 1: mysterium and sacramentum
6.5.3 Case study 2: 1 Corinthians 2: 13
6.5.4 Consistency as a criterion for literalism
6.6 Translation techniques
6.6.1 Borrowings
6.6.2 Periphrastic renderings
6.6.3 Transpositions and modulations
6.6.4 Case study 3: Luke 2: 35
6.6.5 Case study 4: John 15: 26 (a counterexample)
6.7 Conclusions
Conclusions
Appendix: Manetti’s library
Bibliography
Index
Researchers interested in fifteenth-century Italian humanism, translation history, and the history of Biblical scholarship, as well as academic libraries that keep collections of Neo-Latin texts and/or Bible translations.
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